Category Archives: Australian culture

Bill Leak etches no more…. Appreciations galore

Bill Leak, the editorial cartoonist for THE AUSTRALIAN, passed away at the age of 61 from a heart attack. The VALE iin appreciation in that newspaper extends to several pages. But perhaps the best epitaph was from the cartoonist Paul Broelman in the Geelong Advertiser–showing a memorial in stone of a hand with the index finger extended as “Up Yours!!”

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Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, life stories, modernity & modernization, news fabrication, politIcal discourse, press freedom, pulling the leg, slanted reportage, unusual people, world affairs

“The Potential Kill with the Bat” — The Pot says to the Kettle

 “The more players are allowed to say on the field the greater the likelihood something personal will be uttered at the wrong time In that case the administrators will do well to remember that one player in this duel has a bat. If things boil over, something could go seriously wrong” Ian Chappell in “Tough Task for Smith’s side to halt India’s Momentum” in Sunday Advertiser, 12 March 2017

  • Ian Chappell should cast his mind to his glory days when Tony Greig et al for England and Chappell et al for the Aussies launched abuse as a weapon on the cricket field, Continue reading

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DNA from Tindale’s Hair Samples unlock Australian Aboriginal Puzzle

Carl Zimmer, courtesy of the New York Times, where the title runsHow Did Aboriginal Australians Arrive on the Continent? DNA Helps Solve a Mystery”

Human skeletons and archaeological remains in Australia can be traced back nearly 50,000 years before the trail disappears. Before then, apparently, Australia was free of humans. So how did people get there, and when? Where did humans first arrive on the continent, and how did they spread across the entire landmass?

Answers to some of these questions are stored in the DNA of Aboriginal Australians. A genetic study of 111 Aboriginal Australians, published on Wednesday, offers an interesting — and, in some respects, unexpected — view of their remarkable story.

A study found that all living Aboriginal Australians descend from a single founding population that arrived about 50,000 years ago… Pic fr. PC Poulsen/Hulton Archive/Getty

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Filed under Australian culture, australian media, cultural transmission, evolution of languages(s), heritage, historical interpretation, unusual people, world events & processes

Unique Prime Ministerial Encounter at Manuka Oval in Canberra

An Unique Happening occurred at Manuka Oval and thereafter in Canberra on the 15th February 2017. It involved  1) a Courtesy extended by the Australian Prime Minister to a national team visiting for a very short tour;  2) The Toss being enacted by by the two Prime Ministers with the captains in attendance; and  3) a Group photograph of the teams with both Prime Ministers…. and 4) The presence at the match of the Governor General H.E Peter Cosgrove and Lady Cosgrove in addition to the two Prime Ministers and some members of both Parliaments.

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Filed under Australian culture, australian media, centre-periphery relations, governance, landscape wondrous, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, world events & processes

The Tea Business in Ceylon and the Life and Times of Tony Peries

Tony Donaldson. in a Vale for the  Late Tony Peries of Colombo & Sydney, courtesy of THE CEYLANKAN, 2017 edn , where the title is “Remembering Tony Peries” … with emphasis added by The Editor, Thuppahi.

My first encounter with Tony Peries took place in 2003.  By chance, I stumbled upon a meeting of the Ceylon Society in Melbourne one Sunday afternoon at which Tony was giving a talk about his book George Steuart & Co Ltd 1952 – 1973: A Personal Odyssey, published in 2003, a copy of which occupies a prominent position on my bookshelf.   He made an immediate impression on me as a gifted speaker with a natural stage persona that drew audiences into his world.

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Baddaginnie in Victoria: Its Sinhala Name and its History

Thiru Arumugam, courtesy of The Ceylankan, vol 77, Jan 2017

Introduction:  Baddaginnie (hungry belly in Sinhala) is a small village in north-east Victoria, Australia, about 180 km from Melbourne. Its population was 465 persons in the 2011 Census. This article describes how it got its name, the early history of the place, and a brief biography of the Surveyor, J G W Wilmot who gave Baddaginnie its name.

baddaginnie-4Fig 4-– Baddaginnie High Street in 1905-Museum of Victoria Continue reading

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Against Extremism: In Defence of 26th January Australia Day

Greg Sheridan, in The Australian, Thursday, 2 February 2017, where the title is “If Australia day is Illegitimate, so are We”and visit http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/greg-sheridan/if-australia-day-is-illegitimate-so-are-we/news-story/eded818b24fa646b643829177fb1c6fa …..where there already are 155 comments

a-oz-day-22 a-oz-day-33Australia should celebrate Australia Day on January 26 because it is right to do so. It is the day modern institutions, in our case British institutions, entered Australian life. They have brought with them the entire institutional and indeed ethical framework of modern Australia. They brought the rule of law, individual human rights, independent courts, free media, multiple centres of power in government.

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Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, British colonialism, cultural transmission, democratic measures, heritage, historical interpretation, Left politics, life stories, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, psychological urges, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, world events & processes, zealotry