Category Archives: Australian culture

Australia: International Students– Chinese Inflow

‘Tim Dodd, in The Australian, 18 April 2018, with the title “Chinese defy warnings and flock to Australian universities”

Chinese students have defied unspecified ‘‘safety’’ warnings from their government amid fears of undue Chinese influence, flocking to Australia in larger numbers this year than ever before. Official figures to be released today show 173,000 Chinese students enrolled in Australian universities, colleges and schools in the first two months of 2018, 18 per cent more than in the same period last year.

In total, 542,000 students from more than 190 countries have enrolled in Australia so far this year, according to the latest data. This is 13 per cent more than for the same period last year, indicating yet another boost is on the way for education exports, which were valued at $32.2 billion in 2017. Continue reading

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Warnergate in South Africa for the Aussie Cricketers

Peter Lalor in The Australian, 28 March 2019, where the title runs “Fourth Test in doubt amid claims players want to abandon tour”

Australia’s cricket team is in upheaval and players want to quit the tour of South Africa and abandon the fourth and final Test, a former player says. Gavin Robertson told Fox Sports News on Tuesday night that morale within the dressing room is so bad that players don’t want to play in the next Test, which begins on Friday. “They are going to break apart in the next couple days,” he told Fox Sports’ Bill and Boz. “I spoke to people this morning, the players don’t want to play the test. Generally, they don’t feel like playing because they are absolutely gutted.”

The team has cancelled Wednesday night’s training session as players and officials reel from the banishment of Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft over the ball tempering scandal.

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The Will to Win in Australian Cricket. Outcomes

Michael Roberts

Australian cricket mirrors Australian sporting culture in that it  is marked by a relentless will to win. At the highest level of Australian cricket in recent years it has generated several outcomes. I summarize these consequences in haphazard order.

  1. As revealed recently in South Africa, it has led to ball-tampering – probably acts that have been quite systematic in the recent past.
  2. This has been accompanied by pugnacious mourning – exemplified over recent years by the on-field face and verbals of Stephen Smith.
  3. It has heightened the age-old Australian cricketing philosophy of verbal intimidation within the cricket field directed towards unsettling the opposing batsmen and securing wickets …. and a WIN.
  4. Verbal assaults have on occasions been supported by intimidating bouncer-barrages that exceed the limits set bythe  ICC … a practice that led to the unintentional killing of Phil Hughes in a Sheffield Shield match (see Roberts 2016)

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China’s SILENT INVASION of Australia

Paul Monk reviewing  Clive Hamilton’s SILENT INVASION in The  Weekend Australian, 17 March 2018

At a recent Lunar New Year dinner in Perth hosted by the Australia China Business Council, Twiggy Forrest, billionaire founder of Fortescue Metals Group which sells China a lot of iron ore, denounced what he called ‘‘immature commentary’’ about China. ‘‘This has to stop,’’ he declared, as it fuelled ‘‘distrust, paranoia and a loss of respect’’.

Adam Handley of MinterEllison, West Australian president of the ACBC, agreed. They spoke of China as being ‘‘an ally’’, one we need more than it needs us and one that has been ‘‘neglected in recent times, as Australia lost sight of its long-term national interests’’. Continue reading

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The Rule of Law in Australia aids Qi Guang Guo

Michael Inman & Steven Trask, Canberra Times, 5 March 2018 where the title is Älleged Triad boss Qi Guang Guo wins $35,001 for unlawful detention””

The Australian government has been ordered to pay $35,001 to the alleged head of a Sydney-based Triad crime gang, know as the “Big Circle”, after he was wrongly locked up in immigration detention. It is the second time Qi Guang Guo, 60, has been compensated by the Commonwealth for wrongful imprisonment after he won $100,000 when he was illegally detained for 132 days between 2004 and 2005.

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China’s Penetration of Australia in SILENT INVASION

Rowan Callick, from The Australian, 21 February 2018, where the title runs “Clive Hamilton: poking the Chinese dragon”

The debate on the growing influence of the Chinese government within Australian institutions, which has grabbed the attention of policymakers around the world, is about to roar decibels louder. For Silent Invasion, Clive Hamilton’s controversial new 350-page book that was knocked back by several nervous publishers before finally being taken on by Hardie Grant, will raise a noisy row when it goes on sale on Monday.

One of Australia’s best-known public intellectuals, Hamilton is not easily silenced. He has pursued a succession of big-picture issues that he has identified as challenging our national wellbeing, most famously climate change and consumerism. Continue reading

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Legends of People, Myths of State

  Bruce Kapferer’s 1988 book has appeared with contributions by Rohan Bastin, Barry Morris, David Rampton and Roshan de Silva Wijeyeratne

BERGHAHN, 446 pages, 18 illus., bibliog., index ….. ISBN  978-0-85745-436-2 $34.95/£24.00 Pb Published (December 2011) ………eISBN 978-0-85745-517-8 eBook Continue reading

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