Category Archives: Australian culture

Ramsay Centre’s Multi-Million Dollar Imperial Incursion into ANU Rejected

Robert Bolton, courtesy of Financial Review, 15 June 2018, where the title is Why the ANU vice-chancellor Brian Schmidt rejected the Ramsay Centre’s millions” … with highlighting being the imposition of The Editor, Thuppahi

At Tuesday’s meeting of Sydney University’s academic board vice-chancellor Michael Spence took the unusual step of requesting that a discussion about the Ramsay Centre for Western Civilisation be cut from the minutes. According to the student newspaper Honi Soit Dr Spence explained to those in the room, “there are some cultural warriors on the Ramsay Centre Board”.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, democratic measures, economic processes, education, education policy, heritage, politIcal discourse, world events & processes, zealotry

Ernest Renan as Pathway to National Reconciliation in Australia

Stan Grant, ABC News, 31 May 2018, with title  Äboriginal reconciliation and what we can learn from a French philosopher”

What can a French historian and philosopher tell us about reconciliation between black and white in Australia? More than a century ago, when in Australia it was still widely presumed that Aboriginal people were a dying race, Ernest Renan was grappling with the question, what is a nation? It remains one of the most profound and powerful statements of identity, written in 1882 in the shadows of the French Revolution.

 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Australian culture, australian media, British imperialism, cultural transmission, democratic measures, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, modernity & modernization, nationalism, politIcal discourse, reconciliation, self-reflexivity, slanted reportage, the imaginary and the real, Uncategorized, world events & processes

Normality in A Twist

God’s Willing Palm

.…  only in Sri Lanka ! …. especially in political circles!

China’s Penetration of Australia

  …. no limits to Photoshop !

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, Australian culture, cultural transmission, fundamentalism, landscape wondrous, taking the piss, the imaginary and the real, world events & processes

Professor Laksiri Jayasuriya: A Far-Reaching life in Sri Lanka and Australia, 1931-2018

Siri Gamage, courtesy of Colombo Telegraph

Emeritus Professor Laksiri Jayasuriya (Laksiri) who was Professor of Social Work and Social administration at the University of Western Australia passed away on April 20th 2018 in Perth. He was the founder of the sociology department at the University of Colombo and led an illustrious career in the Australian academia while contributing to government policy making processes in areas such as multiculturalism, ethnic affairs,migration and citizenship. He nurtured cohorts of students under his care during his long career in Australia and continued to engage in scholarly activities and publishing after retirement. Professor Jayasuriya leaves behind bellowed wife Rohini and two loving sons Kanishka and Pradeep – both professionals – one in the academia and the other in medical field. His death comes as a great loss to his academic colleagues, particularly in Australia and Sri Lanka.

Prof Laksiri Jayasuriya

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Australian culture, australian media, charitable outreach, cultural transmission, education, education policy, heritage, historical interpretation, Left politics, life stories, modernity & modernization, nationalism, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, self-reflexivity, social justice, sri lankan society, unusual people, welfare & philanthophy, world events & processes

Talking to Gideon Haigh about Kerry Packer and The Cricket War

ESPN interview with Gideon Haigh at http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/23408427/story-gideon-haigh-story-packer-affair

 

THIS is a story you must listen to. It is not only about cricket, but also about commercial rights, its politics and the tale of a revolutionary transformation of the pictorial technology presenting cricket to its followers on TV. Michael Roberts Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, commoditification, democratic measures, economic processes, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, performance, photography, politIcal discourse, power politics, unusual people, world events & processes

A Corpse That has Healed and Linked Japanese and Aussies

Ian  McPhedran, in The Australian, 23 April 2018, where the title reads “Anzac Day: for Jack Hart, battle within was more ferocious than hand-to-hand combat in war”

Jack Hart went to war — twice. The first time, he survived critical injuries deep in the jungle. The second time, it was the psychological injuries that nearly did him in, says his former wife, Jean.

Izumi and Bill Hart with a copy of a monograph about Jack Hart written by Bill’s mother, Jean, and the signed World War II flag returned to a Japanese peace museum.
Izumi and Bill Hart with a copy of a monograph about Jack Hart written by Bill’s mother, Jean, and the signed World War II flag returned to a Japanese peace museum.

John Edward Hart was born in Sydney in 1923, enlisted in 1941 and was posted to Rabaul on the island of New Britain as an anti-aircraft gunner attached to the 1400-strong Lark Force in August 1941. Five months later, the Japanese captured Rabaul. Hart was among a small number of Diggers who escaped. Most of Lark Force were either killed in the battle, captured and executed, or died later when an American submarine sank the Japanese prison ship Montevideo Maru. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, charitable outreach, cultural transmission, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, pilgrimages, reconciliation, rehabilitation, religiosity, self-reflexivity, tolerance, travelogue, unusual people

Australia: International Students– Chinese Inflow

‘Tim Dodd, in The Australian, 18 April 2018, with the title “Chinese defy warnings and flock to Australian universities”

Chinese students have defied unspecified ‘‘safety’’ warnings from their government amid fears of undue Chinese influence, flocking to Australia in larger numbers this year than ever before. Official figures to be released today show 173,000 Chinese students enrolled in Australian universities, colleges and schools in the first two months of 2018, 18 per cent more than in the same period last year.

In total, 542,000 students from more than 190 countries have enrolled in Australia so far this year, according to the latest data. This is 13 per cent more than for the same period last year, indicating yet another boost is on the way for education exports, which were valued at $32.2 billion in 2017. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, authoritarian regimes, commoditification, economic processes, education, education policy, governance, historical interpretation, life stories, modernity & modernization, politIcal discourse, teaching profession, travelogue, world events & processes