Category Archives: centre-periphery relations

Blake Foreshadows New American Approach to Sri Lanka … and the Rajapaksa Combo

Daya Gamage, in Asian Tribune, 12 May 2019, with this title “Robert Blake indicates Washington’s new approach to Sri Lanka”

Robert O’Blake, former (2006-2009) American ambassador to Sri Lanka and onetime assistant secretary for South and Central Asian Bureau (2009-2012) of the US Department of State indicated how Washington would approach Sri Lanka having seen the deteriorating security situation in this South Asian nation – which could affect Washington’s military design in the Indo-Pacific region – while assessing the rapidly changing political environment possibly favoring the return of the Rajapaksas.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under american imperialism, centre-periphery relations, China and Chinese influences, discrimination, economic processes, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Indian Ocean politics, life stories, military strategy, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, power politics, Rajapaksa regime, security, self-reflexivity, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, truth as casualty of war, war reportage, world events & processes

Nigel Farage castigated by a Sri Lankan British Namesake …. British Imperial History Flogged

Nigel Kerner to Nigel Farage and the BREXIT & UKIP PARTY A Letter entitled “To a Land of Dope & Gory. The Farage Balloon”

What hypocrites so many white Brits are. So many of us  positively stink of racism and that brand of cowardice that hides behind contrived mental devices that are designed to try to fool the world that we are decent fair objective people. Just look at the faces on any football terrace any weekend if you want to see what many Brits are really like. Animals snarling in an open terraced Zoo. Shouting racist slurs and chants at black athletes and football players whose skill often surpasses those of white players. So much for the once vaunted ‘British gentleman’ that once justifiably announced our better senses.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, British colonialism, British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, charitable outreach, economic processes, historical interpretation, life stories, patriotism, politIcal discourse, security, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, world events & processes

Missing the Boat. How Religio-Political Divisions have Deepened

A Letter from Rohan De Soysa in Colombo to Michael Roberts in Adelaide, 9th May 2019

I’d like to suggest a different angle. We have a Minister for Buddhist religious affairs, another for Hindu religious affairs, yet another for Muslim religious affairs and still another for Christian religious affairs.  Then there are Governors for the various provinces: Eastern Province, Western Province, Northern Province, Southern Province etc.  They have been provided deputy ministers, offices, staff, bodyguards, cell phones and vehicles, etc.

Should they not monitor and observe any untoward teachings and undesirable tendencies in what comes under their purview, namely places of worship and education, catering to their specialized religions? Why did they not do so? Isn’t it about time they did?

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under accountability, arab regimes, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, cultural transmission, discrimination, disparagement, economic processes, education, electoral structures, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, island economy, jihad, landscape wondrous, language policies, legal issues, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, Muslims in Lanka, patriotism, politIcal discourse, power politics, religiosity, security, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

Ultimate Loyalties: Sri Lankan Muslims in Lanka but beyond the Nation

Rajeewa Jayaweera in a Comment that responds toa QUERY from Michael O’Leary addressed to Ameer Ali

Michael, If one contributes to the absurd theory, [that] only those who returned from Saudi Arabia make up the radicalized elements in the Muslim community in SL; there is no sensible and meaningful answer to O” Leary’s question.

If however, one can look beyond the theory of “Peace-loving Muslim Community,” it would be easier to understand. Those who went to Saudi Arabia were mostly from the impoverished segment of Muslim society. They worked as housemaids, laborers, etc. and had nil to minimal educational qualifications. Many returned radicalized in a manner of speaking. Women who covered their heads when they left returned covering their faces. Those who did not adhere strictly to praying five times a day earlier would not dream of missing a single prayer session after their return. Watching movies, even musicals became taboo after their return. Continue reading

6 Comments

Filed under accountability, arab regimes, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, cultural transmission, disparagement, economic processes, education, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, Islamic fundamentalism, island economy, jihad, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, patriotism, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, power politics, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, terrorism, unusual people, vengeance, working class conditions, world events & processes, zealotry

The Demons within Sri Lanka: Long-Term Methods of Abatement?

Michael Roberts

Here I reproduce the second half of a longer article presented in October 2018 where I pinpointed the hidden dangers to Sri Lanka resting within the implications of Mark Field’s visit to the island then — a conveying a message that was one part of the continuing Western nation-cum-UNHCR project to punish Sri Lanka and foist a devolutionary political system on the island. Obviously, this essay was coined before the explosive manifestation of another divisive time-bomb within the Sri Lankan body politic: that of Islamic extremists motivated by the Wahhabi ideology hostile to specific ‘pinnacles’ in any Westernized body politic – such as (a) the Papacy and (b) high-rise hotels marking wealth and ‘debauchery’.**

This traumatic moment on Easter Sunday 21st April 2019 reminds us of two earth shattering moments: the LTTE attack on the Central Bank in Colombo on 31st January 1996 and the Al-Qaida attack on the World Trade Centre in New York on 9th September 2001 (9/11 in shorthand).***

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Al Qaeda, atrocities, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, conspiracies, cultural transmission, education, ethnicity, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, landscape wondrous, language policies, legal issues, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, patriotism, politIcal discourse, power politics, reconciliation, religiosity, security, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, social justice, sri lankan society, suicide bombing, Tamil Tiger fighters, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes

Where Terrorism carved out a Nation: Israel out of Palestine

Jayantha Somasundaram, in Island, April 2019, where the title isPalestine: Where Britain lost the war against terror”

What happened in British mandated Palestine in the run-up to Israeli statehood in May 1948 is a classic example of the triumph of terrorism. The British captured Palestine from the Ottomans during World War I and were mandated by the League of Nations (the precursor to the United Nations) to progress Palestine towards independence. Out of a population of 700,000, the religious breakdown in Palestine was about 500,000 Muslims, 90,000 Jews and 70,000 Christians. Up to the first century AD Palestine had been Jewish-majority, then a Christian-majority society (second to the eleventh century) and thereafter Muslim-majority. (DellaPergola)

Della Pergola

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, economic processes, foreign policy, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, law of armed conflict, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, politIcal discourse, refugees, religious nationalism, terrorism, unusual people, world events & processes, zealotry

Sheridan’s Concise Overview of Security Failures and the Islamic Extremist Threat in Sri Lanka … and This World

Greg Sheridan, in Weekend Australian, 27/28 April 2019, where the title is “Eternal vigilance is the price of keeping Islamist terror at bay”…. with highlighting emphasis added by The Editor

India’s external intelligence agency, the Research and Analysis Wing, tried for two years to tell its Sri Lankan colleagues they faced a growing threat of Islamist terrorism. But the Colombo authorities weren’t interested. If there was any threat, they believed it came from the remnants of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. But the Tamil Tiger threat ended 10 years ago.

We don’t have a problem with our Muslims, the Sri Lankans insisted. By and large they were right about their Muslims. But out of maybe two million Sri Lankan Muslims, there was a problem with at least a couple of hundred, of whom a dozen or so became hard-boiled terrorists. Nine became suicide bombers, 10 if you count the bomb that one suspect detonated as police approached her home. That was more than enough. A Muslim man prays while perched on the roof of a mosque to spot possible hostile people during Friday prayers in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on April 26. Picture: AP

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, atrocities, australian media, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, conspiracies, cultural transmission, economic processes, ethnicity, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Indian Ocean politics, Indian traditions, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, law of armed conflict, life stories, martyrdom, Middle Eastern Politics, military strategy, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, power politics, religious nationalism, security, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, suicide bombing, Taliban, terrorism, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes