Category Archives: cricket for amity

A Cricketing Prasasti for Kusal from Andrew

Andrew Fernando, in ESPNcrcinfo, 18 February 2019, where the title is Kusal Perera bats with body, heart and soul in innings of a lifetime”

That vein.

The vein on Dale Steyn‘s forehead has come alive. He is mid-pitch, biceps taut, knees bent, fists clenched, face red, practically on fire, screaming.

Mitchell Johnson had three furious seasons. James Anderson nicks entire top orders off. But let’s not kid around. If there is a sight that has struck fear into the heart of the planet’s batsmen in the last 15 years; if there is a vision that shakes them to their soul, it is this.

Steyn. His vein. Mid-pitch. Screaming.

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Remembering Adiel Anghie, 1941-2015

Upali Obeyesekere, President, JPAA Canada, in a testimonial in 2015, entitled  Adiel Anghie, the Peterite superstar”

Adiel Anghie was a phenomenal product of St. Peter’s College, Bambalapitiya. He was a brilliant all-round student who excelled in studies and sports. He entered the medical faculty of the University of Ceylon from his alma mater after a colourful sports career that saw him lead the St. Peter’s College Rugby Team in addition to the Cricket Team. This is a rare combination for any sportsman at school level. To top it all, Adiel scored a brilliant century (101) in the 1961 JosephianPeterite Encounter that was drawn.

Adiel Anghie captained St. Peters College Cricket Team in 1961. Team picture annexed herewith
Standing L to R: Tissa Jayaweera, David Heyn, Travice Fernando, Rohan Abeysundera, Sam Rajah, Adithiya de Silva, Maurice Deckker
Seated L to R: Tyrone Le Mercier, Richard Alles, Adiel Anghie, Richard Heyn, Didacus de Almeida

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Kusal! Kusal! Improbable Victory in Durban celebrated within an Email Circuit

aa SAF 13

 I = A Note from Mike Morley, A Kiwi in Adelaide

Michael Morley
5:41 AM (43 minutes ago)

I DO hope you hadn’t switched off either after the first 2 wickets in 2 balls, let alone the second. I’d been watching until they got to over 200, and then switched on to watch a bit of the rugby I’d recorded. Then switched back when they were round 220, and decided to watch till the end, as it looked to me that No. 11 just MIGHT last two balls.

Thank God I stayed with it. What a win! And what an innings from Perera!

Unbelievable how unflustered he seemed. And what glorious sixes! Let alone the final four brilliantly placed through slips. His SECOND Test century? Incredible!

You’ll probably be celebrating all week ….. M

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Tamil Demonstrations and Thommo’s Thunderbolts: Sri Lanka at Kennington Oval at the 1975 World Cup

Michael Roberts

While some of these striking photographs have been presented before in Cricketique or in Thuppahi, they have not been assembled under one roof before. They are significant both for political and cricketing reasons.  

In cricketing terms we had a talented troupe of players back home so that the final choice of fourteen left very competent players out of scene. The preparations were quite remarkable. The larger pool of players was sent to Nuwara Eliya in order to acclimatize themselves while practicing at Radalla.

Standing left-to-right: David Heyn, Roy Dias, Sarath Fernando, Neil Perera (Asst Manager), Raja Wickremasinhe (Fitness Trainer( and KMT Perera (Manager)  Squatting left-to right: Duleep Mendis, Bandula Warnapura jit deSilva, Anura Ranasinghe, Lalith Kaluperuma, Dennis Chanmugam, DS de Silva, Ranjit Fernando, Tony Opatha, Anura Tennekoon, HSM Pieris ….. Missing because traveling to Nuwara Eliya by car:  Michael Tissera and Sunil Wettimuny

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In Memory of Tony Greig

James Mettyear, in The CRICKET MONTHLY of ESPN, 27 December 2018, where the chosen title is Greigy, Robbo, and me” … with its location here in THUPPAHI rather than in CRICKETIQUE marking my appreciation of Tony Grieg’s key role in the Kerry Packer transformation of the cricketing world as well as his sturdy role in protecting Murali from Cricket Australia’s machinations in 1995- 1998 and thereafter …. about which I will say more soon (in repetition of work already in print) Michael Roberts

The Central Recreation Ground, Hastings was where I first saw Tony Greig. I’d heard a lot about him. My cricket chum’s excited description of his debut innings in county cricket earlier in the 1967 season – 156 with 15 fours and two sixes, including one off Brian Statham, over extra cover – had filled me with wide-eyed awe. But Sussex versus Kent in the County Championship was my first sighting.

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Evaluation: Forces and Strands in Sri Lanka’s Cricket History

Binod K. Mishra, reviewing Forces and Strands in Sri Lanka’s Cricket History” by Michael Roberts, Colombo, Social Scientists’ Association, 2006, 64 pp., 21 photographs, bibliography, Rs. 300 (paperback), ISBN 9559102826 …. location of original review and date of publication is yet unclear

“Arise Sir Davenel”

Cricket brought to Sri Lanka the reputation of, and a genuine recognition as, a nation. The rationale for such an observation is the infamous reputation Sri Lanka has earned due to decade-old ethnic rivalry and insurgency that has threatened the concept of nationhood in the country. The World Cup triumph in 1996 and the heroic performances before and after that event have put Sri Lanka prominently not onlyon the sports map but also on the political map of the world in a positive sense. But the story of the riseof Sri Lankan cricket is not a normal rags-to-riches story but is filled with events that in some sense correspond to its political history. Michael Roberts’ work presents this interesting story of Sri Lankan cricket. Written in the year 2004, the booklet recapitulates, albeit briefly, the entire history of the game on this country. It is a vivid description of the evolution of cricket in the former colony of Britain. Throughout the evolutionary history of cricket, the author finds a clear reflection of the socio-political situation of Sri Lanka. Continue reading

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At Cricket in 1946: British India vs England

Anindya Dutta, in The Cricket Monthly, 25 June 2018, where the title reads “A dinner in 1946”

It was the last tour by undivided India to Britain. It was the summer of Merchant and Mankad, and independence was around the corner.The year was 1946. England was caught between the exhilaration of emerging victorious from the Second World War and the devastation the war had wrought upon the country, both in terms of people and resources. Rationing was still in place, and the economy was in tatters.For six long years, while war raged, cricket had taken a backseat. There had been little first-class cricket, and the battlefields claimed some of England’s most talented players, like the venerated Hedley Verity. There were only 11 first-class matches in the 1945 season. Nineteen forty-six was the first year when a normal county season was scheduled and Test cricket could again be played. Cricket was seen as a way to restore a feeling of normalcy to a country severely affected by war and its consequences.

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