Category Archives: education

The Aditye Wansaya presenting the Lindamulage Clan

Johnny De Silva, presenting a typed copy of the English translation of an ola book, The Aditiya Wansaya,  carried out by Pandit Yatinuwara Indaratne Thero for my granduncle Mr Charles de Silva

THE ADITYE DYNASTY (CLAN) OR  ADITYE WANSAYA

The son of Aditiya was known as Aditye i.e. the sun. The lineage that originates from the sun is known as the Solar  dynasty, or ‘Surya Wansaya’.  The ‘Aditye Wansaya’ is the Solar Dynasty in another name; and those that belong to this clan are of Royal descent. The foremost of the Royal clans in ancient India was the Aditye Clan. The ‘Surya Wansaya’ ‘Dinakan Wansaya’ are other names used for this clan.

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Royal College: Its Early Beginnings …. From Marsh and Boake

D. L. Seneviratne“Lam to one and all”

rolyal b to m

Royal College – Marsh to Boake FRONT COVER

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Virus Free? Playmates Horsing Around in Adelaide

FL …. 24 March

Hi Guys, This modelling by Unis Sydney shows why we need to exercise our social distancing now. This sort of modelling is a powerful tool in the fight against the virus and modelling becomes more powerful when supported by observation. Wuhan and China in general have provided that supporting observation.

And what does the orange fwit in America want to do....the exact bloody opposite.

If we’re to keep Saturday tennis, I’ll bring some hand sanitiser for use between sets.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-25/coronavirus-covid-19-modelling-stay-home-chart/12084144
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Census Categorization and the Bharathas and Colombo Chetties

A Note from Fabian D. K.  Schokman of Moratuwa, 22 March 2020

Dear Michael,  Thank you for this. I believe, as with most of the “lesser minorities,” the Bharatha community did not have its own classification until the 2001 census, when there was a breakthrough mostly on account of the Chetties and their successful fight to be classed as a distinct ethnicity. Throughout census history, one can see the Chetties demanding to be classed as distinct from the Tamils. The term “race” in SL, must always be seen as a synonym for “ethnicity” and not with the same connotation it derives in the West.

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Covid as Equalizer and Unifier: A Filipino Sage

Herman Tiu Laurel, in Phillipine News Agency, 4 March 2020,where the title runs Covid-19 should unify the world”


AS the Covid-19 virus jumps vast distances and oceans to other continents, we see how other countries are adopting lessons from China’s responses, including mass “lockdowns” and other preemptive moves. The effectiveness of China’s response has resulted in a reduction of the Covid-19 crisis after just three short months, unlike past epidemics that took almost a year before subsiding.

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Facing Corona Foursquare: An Aussie Comprehensive

Sheryn Groch, in Sydney Morning Herald, 18 March 2020, “How are countries ‘flattening the curve’ of coronavirus?” …. https://www.smh.com.au/national/how-are-countries-flattening-the-curve-of-coronavirus-20200317-p54b3g.html
Large parts of the world are shutting down to stem the spread of a new virus. What measures are working? And how fast should Australia be moving? You can’t see the virus behind the world’s latest pandemic with the naked eye but, plotted on a graph, it looks like one side of a mountain, climbing skyward as case numbers soar past 197,000 people in little more than three months. Eventually, epidemiologists say, that trajectory will start to fall. Immunity in the population will build up against the mystery illness, now known as COVID-19, and it will begin to die out.

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The Bharathas of Sri Lanka: Roots and Tales

Jeremy De Lima, in The Ceylankan Number 1 of February 2020, Journal 89 Volume XXIII…… Bhāratha’s, பரதர், භාරත

  United Nations Map – (Common source material)

 India and Sri Lanka are geographically very near, but yet so far in culture, civilisation and genetic diversity. As depicted in the map above, the sub-oceanic existence of the hitherto mystical “Adams Bridge” between Dhanushkodi in India and Talaimannar in Sri Lanka has now been conclusively shown to exist through aerial mapping. It is thus reasonable to conclude that natural movement would have occurred between India and Sri Lanka over the aeons. While there is much documented history about Sinhalese and Tamils, there appears to be a relative dearth of public knowledge of a smaller migrant race called the Bhāratha’s. The writer hopes this compilation will improve the knowledge of this now vanishing group who have unobtrusively and yet so selflessly contributed so much to the history of this Island nation.

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