Category Archives: foreign policy

SK Wickremesinghe laid to rest

ONE = DailyFT 12 June 2020. …. http://www.ft.lk/news/S-K-Wickremesinghe-no-more/56-701586

S.K. Wickremesinghe, a well-known and much respected figure both in Sri Lankan business and diplomatic circles and eldest son of Martin Wickremesinghe, has passed away on Thursday at the age of 94.


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Battling the West. For Sri Lanka. Naseby at his Best

Professor Rajiva Wijesinha, in Island, 16 June 2020 where the title is “Lord Naseby’s Paradise”

It is a great joy to come across someone who loves this country passionately. In the case of Lord Naseby the joy is enhanced by the practical aspects of his devotion, his unceasing efforts to promote Sri Lanka’s interests and to combat what he sees as unremitting and vicious hostility to Sri Lanka on the part of successive governments.

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Ground Zero in Australian Politics towards China

Fair Dinkum

The Australia-China relationship has fallen to zero – the worst it has been since the relationship was established in 1972. The trigger for this recent deterioration was the Australian Prime Minister’s calling for the World Health Organization to be given weapon inspector powers into China as part of the COVID-19 inquiry,[1] an idea rejected by Rob Barton,[2] a former UN weapons inspector sent into Iraq in 2003 as part of the UN Special Commission, or UNSCOM. In Iraq, UNSCOM was infiltrated by agents of US intelligence services who used espionage equipment to eavesdrop on the Iraqi military for three years without the knowledge of the UN agency which was used to disguise its work. [3]

 

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Learning from Lord Naseby’s Passages within Sri Lanka

Anil Perera at https://lankanvoice.blogspot.com/ & whose preferred title is Michael Naseby’s Paradise Lost Paradise Regained – Memoirs of a True Friend of Sri Lanka” 

Having been barraged with unfair criticism, lectured on with unsolicited advice, and abused by some British politicians for defeating their beloved Tamil Tigers, Sri Lankans can take solace in the existence of at least some British politicians who are sensible enough to digest facts and come to logical conclusions. While most Western politicians swallow the Tamil narrative hook, line, and sinker, there are few like Lord Naseby, who keeps an ear to the ground and finds out what happened during the terrorist war in Sri Lanka. Lord Naseby’s experience in living in Sri Lanka in the 1960s and his continuous association with the country would have certainly helped him to find out the truth of what happened during the last stages of the Sri Lankan conflict.

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The Looming Presence of China read circa 2018

Vishwamithra … date ??

Sri Lanka is surrounded by the Indian Ocean. Yet, the physical presence of India up north has had an intimidating influence on most of Sri Lankans. While its admirers, especially those Indophiles, who have made it a point to be more conversed in India’s history, culture, cuisine and her people than their own history and people, have chosen to subordinate their love for the country to an intellectual odyssey.

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Justin Trudeau Rapped on Knuckles for Statement on Victims of Eelam War

When Justin Trudeau issued a brief statement on the 18th May 2020 expressing sympathy for all the victims of Eelam War IV in the course of his request for an accountability purpose, he was clever. There was no slant towards Tamil victims. But there was a reference to “the last phase of the war at Mullivaikal” …. and this, together with the focus on accountability, implied that he was supporting Sri Lankan Tamil and HR claims alleging mass killings.

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Standing by the Victory in May 2009: Gotabaya confronts the Western UN Caucus

A Staff Writer, News First,  19 May,2020:Won’t hesitate to withdraw Sri Lanka from bodies which target soldiers: President Rajapaksa”

President Gotabaya Rajapaksa said on Tuesday addressing the war hero’s ceremony at the war memorial at the Parliament grounds that he will not hesitate to pull out Sri Lanka from any international organization that unfairly target the country’s war heroes.

Pix from The Hindu

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A Nazi Slant to Aussie Racist Attacks on China and Chinese

Fair Dinkum

 

 

 

 

Nazi and China flags tied to a tower in central Kyabram, Victoria, Australia

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FOR Sri Lanka: Engaging Lord Naseby and His Journeys in Sri Lanka

Michael Roberts

Since I had been introduced to the British peer Lord Michael Naseby in the surrounds of the House of Lords in March 2018,[1] I assumed that he had been born into the aristocratic upper layer of British society. Wrong. It required his book Sri Lanka for me to learn that he was from the upper middle class and had contested parliamentary seats from the late-960s on behalf of the Conservative Party in what were Labour strongholds – with his peerage being of 1990s vintage. As vitally, his early career as a marketing executive had seen him working in Pakistan and Bengal in the early 1960s before he was stationed in Sri Lanka as a marketing manager for Reckitt and Colman in the period 1963-64.

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Word Pictures in Deciphering Sri Lankan History, Politics, War

Jonathon Riley, reviewing Michael Naseby: Sri Lanka. Paradise Lost. Paradise Regained, 2020, London, Unicorn

Sri Lanka, Ceylon – geographically so close to the Indian sub-continent and yet with a culture and history that has been for many centuries distinct. What a difference a few miles of water make – as we in England know well. I recall visiting Sri Lanka in 1993 and, on the anniversary of independence in 1948, and reading a leader in the newspaper that suggested maybe it would have been a good idea to have stayed with Britain a few years longer. A brave sentiment indeed and one which, after more than twenty years, makes much more sense having read Michael Naseby’s book.

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