Category Archives: fundamentalism

Challenging Hannah Beech: The Strangulation of the Rohingyas, 1948-2019

Gerald Peiris, … responding to https://thuppahi.wordpress.com/2019/07/16/buddhist-zealots-in-sri-lanka-and-myanmar-stir-the-cauldron/See Note at head of References

The section of the Bangladesh frontier in the south-east runs adjacent to the northern Arakan states of Myanmar (formerly, Burma) —a politically turbulent area which has, at least from the late 1940s, been featured by spells of high intensity conflict between the government of Myanmar and the Arakanese Muslims, the ‘Rohingya.’ The length of time over which the Rohingya have coexisted in this hilly area with the numerically larger ‘Rakhine’ — a predominantly Buddhist ethnic group— is not known with certainty. The Rohingya claim in this regard is that their roots could be traced back to the 10th century Muslim migrations into Burma, and that, in the northern Arakan, they constituted an independent principality for more than three centuries from 1430 to 1784.[i]  This has been disputed.  The official stand of the government of Myanmar (which has, in fact, been corroborated in certain scholarly writings) is that the Rohingya community consists largely of Bengali Muslims who migrated into this area after the annexation of Arakan by the British in 1843.

Pics from 2017 selected by Thuppahi from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/rohingya-crisis-photos_n_5a3bc302e4b025f99e150f1d

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, asylum-seekers, atrocities, authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, chauvinism, communal relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, human rights, legal issues, life stories, nationalism, politIcal discourse, power politics, religious nationalism, self-reflexivity, trauma, truth as casualty of war, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes

Buddhist Zealots in Sri Lanka and Myanmar stir the Cauldron

Hannah Beech, in New York Times, 8 July 2019, where the title runs “Buddhists Go to Battle: When Nationalism Overrides Pacifism” …. A call to arms for Sri Lankan monks. Ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya in Myanmar. A Buddhist faith known for pacifism is taking its place in a new age of nationalism

GINTOTA, Sri Lanka — The Buddhist abbot was sitting cross-legged in his monastery, fulminating against the evils of Islam, when the petrol bomb exploded within earshot. But the abbot, the Venerable Ambalangoda Sumedhananda Thero, barely registered the blast. Waving away the mosquitoes swarming the night air in the southern Sri Lankan town of Gintota, he continued his tirade: Muslims were violent, he said, Muslims were rapacious. The aim of Muslims is to take over all our land and everything we value,” he said. “Think of what used to be Buddhist lands: Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kashmir, Indonesia. They have all been destroyed by Islam.”

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Bodu Bala Sena, Buddhism, communal relations, cultural transmission, disparagement, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, nationalism, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, power politics, religious nationalism, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes

Addressing the 9/11 Conspiracy Theorists: Where Fervour Trumps ‘Deep Throats’

Michael Roberts

When one of my articles on the jihadist network that perpetrated the 21/4 attacks in Sri Lanka referred to the inspirations behind the 9/11 attacks in USA, I was surprised to receive vehement rejections of the latter contention from two good friends and one distant  ‘aide’ in Canada – challenges sent independently of each other.

These challenges have been rejected by other friends – at times quite bluntly. But Jeremy Liyanage,[1] Jean-Pierre Page[2] and Chris Black[3] are individuals with whom I have interacted fruitfully and whose commitment to the pursuit of truth and reform in this world are not in doubt. So, this revisiting of 9/11 and its perpetrators on my part is a personal journey that addresses my three friends, while yet seeking to raise significant issues in today’s world – especially embracing the ramifications of the ideological currents known as “Wahhabism” and “Salafism” (terms that seem to be deployed interchangeably).[4] Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Afghanistan, Al Qaeda, arab regimes, architects & architecture, atrocities, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, cultural transmission, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, landscape wondrous, life stories, martyrdom, photography, politIcal discourse, power politics, security, self-reflexivity, slanted reportage, Taliban, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes

Anti-Muslim Violence Present and Past

Shamara Wettimuny, in Sunday Observer, 14 July 2019, where the title is “A brief history of anti-Muslim violence in Sri Lanka”

The recent Easter attacks targeting a number of churches and hotels devastated Sri Lanka. Over 250 people were killed, and many more injured. Within days of the attack, it emerged that the perpetrators of the attack were affiliated to radical Islamist groups in Sri Lanka. However, the identification of the perpetrators as ostensibly adherents of the Islamic faith opened the floodgates of discrimination and violence against the broader Muslim community in Sri Lanka.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, atrocities, authoritarian regimes, Bodu Bala Sena, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, conspiracies, cultural transmission, discrimination, disparagement, economic processes, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Islamic fundamentalism, island economy, jihad, life stories, nationalism, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, power politics, religious nationalism, riots and pogroms, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, trauma, truth as casualty of war, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes

The Deep Imprint of Violence within Christianity and Islam

lisetteLisette Thooft, 18 January 2015, in NieuwWij, where the title is “Karen Armstrong: “There is nothing in the Islam that is more violent than Christianity”  .https://www.nieuwwij.nl/english/karen-armstrong-nothing-islam-violent-christianity/

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, cultural transmission, Fascism, female empowerment, fundamentalism, heritage, historical interpretation, human rights, Islamic fundamentalism, landscape wondrous, life stories, martyrdom, nationalism, politIcal discourse, power politics, religiosity, security, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, trauma, unusual people, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes

Dynamite! 9/11 as Dynamite. Friends at War

Michael Roberts

When Islamic zealots within Sri Lanka reaped havoc on people going about their normal practices on Easter Sunday this year 2019 via coordinated suicide attacks that generated carnage and death, I sent A NOTE (see below) around as part of a wider corpus of material on the event.  To my amazement, three friends from disparate backgrounds, French, Canadian and Sri Lankan Australian respectively, expressed strong dissent about the Islamic hand behind the 9//11 carnage in USA — firmly asserting that it was an US government plot.

All four Pics from https://www.reuters.com/news/picture/9-11-iconic-images-idUSRTS20CLO

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, american imperialism, arab regimes, architects & architecture, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, conspiracies, disparagement, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, legal issues, life stories, martyrdom, Middle Eastern Politics, military strategy, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, power politics, propaganda, religious nationalism, security, self-reflexivity, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, suicide bombing, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, trauma, truth as casualty of war, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes

Intolerance. The Deep Currents within Sri Lanka

This last week  i received two emails, one from a friend in Canada and another from a well-placed senior person in Colombo, which, quite independently, touched on Ahmaddiya, Christian and Rohingya refugees brought to the island as transit refugees by UNHCR and parked in the western coastal areas. Bishop Dhiloraj Canagasabey’s recent public address confirmed the thrust of these two emails. The implications are disheartening and should fore all of us Lankans to review our recent history and its shortcomings.

ONE: Email Note from Canada, 15 May 2019

Hello Michael,  The following might be of interest to you as a social scientist. (A) I read the story (in the link below) at Google News – which sends me stories on SL to my inbox, This is interesting as I was unaware that SL had “foreign” refugees. There were rumours that Rishad Badudeen (Minister – Puttalam) was settling some Bangladeshis in Wilpattu. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, arab regimes, asylum-seekers, atrocities, communal relations, cultural transmission, discrimination, disparagement, ethnicity, fundamentalism, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Islamic fundamentalism, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, refugees, rehabilitation, religiosity, security, self-reflexivity, social justice, sri lankan society, tolerance, unusual people, welfare & philanthophy, world events & processes, zealotry