Category Archives: literary achievements

In Honour of Professor Kingsley M. de Silva: Scholarly Excellence

Gerald H Peiris. Island, 3 April 2018,where the title is  “The Pursuit of Scholarly Excellence: Professor Kingsley M. de Silva’s Impact on University Education”

“Honour whom honour is due” (Epistle to the Romans, Holy Bible)

Professor Kingsley de Silva resigned from the academic staff of the University of Peradeniya in 1995. That premature retirement must have been a painful termination of a cherished institutional link, made in the context of those in charge of university affairs at that time making it difficult for him to continue in university service without jeopardising his research commitments.

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Pictorial and Word ‘Recipes’ for Reflection

Rohan de Soysa’s Thoughts and Snaps

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Suntharalingam Saga Across Generations captivates Adelaide

Both Professor Michael Morley (a Kiwi musical maestro) and Professor Justin Labrooy (a Sri Lankan medical specialist) were captivated by the Belvoir production of Counting & Cracking created by the playwright Suntharalingam Shakthidharan which has been one of the highlights of the ongoing ADELAIDE FESTIVAL.

pic by Roshan Fernando

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A Sri Lankan-Australian Experience on Stage

SEE https://youtu.be/WTudekMX91U ….. and LISTEN TO S. SHAKTHITHARAN in conversation with Richard Mockler

against a background of scenes from the play “COUNTING and CRACKING” ….. clarifying the making of  The Sri Lankan-Australian experience in Counting and Cracking | The Mix

The playwright contends that it has been moulded as “a cautionary tale” and that he would love to take the ensemble to Sri Lanka. The play was four years in the making and has a cast of 16 (sixteeen) from six different countries.
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Hemantha Situge’s Reviews of Two Sinhala Books on Gandhi and Mihindhu

Hemantha Situge One, a review of  Mahatma Gandhi: Lanka Gamanaya saha Sri Lankave Dheshapalanya publd by Sarasavi Prakasakayo recently.

The splendid book entitled: Mahatma Gandhi – Lanka Gamanaya Saha Deshapalanaya [Mahatma Gandhi’s visit of Ceylon and Sri Lankan Politics] written by the well-known writer Sampath Bandara and published by the Sarasavi Prakashakayo to commemorate the 150th Birth Anniversary of Mahathma Gandhi was released recently.

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Celebrating Anne Abayasekara’s Mighty Pen and Lifetime

Uvin Dassanayake in Daily News, 14 February 2019, where the title is “The pen PROVED MIGHTY INDEED!”

On Saturday February 9, Cinnamon Gardens Baptist Church was host to a celebration of the work of the late Anne Abayasekara, Sri Lanka’s first woman to become a staff journalist and a much beloved writer over her career of nearly 70 years. The evening proceeded with each of her seven children speaking about their mother, recounting fond memories of the sounds of her typewriter in the family home and sharing poetry she had written for her grandchildren; all to an audience of family, friends and people who had been, in some way, affected by Abayasekara’s work.

Anne with her husband Earle

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An Appreciation of Revd WS Senior of England and Ceylon

Sukumar Shan … in Visual Storyteller

W. S. Senior Reverend Walter Stanley Senior (10 May 1876–23 February 1938) was an English scholar, poet and member of the Church Missionary Society. Popularly known as the “Bard of Lanka”, his works are still widely read in the island nation. He was also Vice Principal of Trinity College, Kandy, Sri Lanka .Walter Stanley Senior was the son of Walter Senior, a clergyman. His uncle was Edward Senior, headmaster of Sheffield Royal Grammar School[6] which he attended from 1888 to 1891. He continued his early education at Marlborough, a school to which he was deeply attached and about which he wrote both in prose and verse. From Marlborough he won a scholarship at Balliol College, Oxford. He took a First Class in Classical Honour Moderations (Intermediate examination) and a Second Class in Greats (classics or philosophy). He was the author of a work titled Pisgah or The Choice, which won the triennial prize poem on a sacred subject in the University of Oxford, 1914.

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