Category Archives: literary achievements

Meeting Anne Abayasekara and Her World: Reflective Words

Published by Perera & Hussein (Bay Owl Press)….……..PRICE: Rs 1250/- (approx US$7.50 / Aus $10.50 / Euro6.50/ Stg 6) ………………….. World-wide orders – copies may be purchased online at the following link:-

https://pererahussein.com/index.php/books/non-fiction/telling-it-like-it-is-phph.html…… Postage (approx Rs 1000 for Australia & Europe)

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Nationalist Studies and the Ceylon Studies Seminar at Peradeniya, 1968-1970s

Michael Roberts

The years 1966 to 1975 were heady days in Ceylon. Especially so for some of us in Peradeniya Univeristy where the CEYLON STUDIES SEMINAR was launched in November 1968 by a few members of the Arts Faculty assisted by the facilities provided by Professor Gananath Obeyesekera at the Sociology Department – located then on Lower Hantane Road away from the centre of teaching. Not least among these facilities was the service provided by the Sociology Department peon Sathiah[i] who cyclostyled the written seminar papers beforehand for circulation so that those who were keen could read any presentation beforehand if they so wished – a procedure that also maximized discussion time. This background service was seconded by the typing services of Mrs Hettiarachchi in the History Department and Mr Kumaraswamy in the Sociology Department.

A . Jeyaratnam Wilson  Gananath Obeyesekera

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Anne Abayasekara in Print Again

NEW BOOK! – ON SALE AT BMICH 27-30 SEPT 2018 …… PRICE Rs 1000 at INTERNATIONAL BOOK FAIR ONLY … Published by Perera & Hussein (Bay Owl Press). Continue reading

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Booker Prize Short-List: Michael Ondaatje excluded

AP Item, in Dawn, September 2018 with this heading “ Man Booker Prize 2018 finalists announced”

A novel in verse and a story about trees and the people who love them are among six finalists announced Thursday for the prestigious Man Booker Prize for fiction. U.K. poet Robin Robertson’s verse novel about violence and social division in contemporary America, “The Long Take,” and U.S. novelist Richard Powers’ eco-saga “The Overstory” — whose characters are both human and arboreal — are on a list that includes three U.K. authors, two Americans and a Canadian.

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Breaching the Presidential Portals of a Venerable Learned Society: Hema Goonatilake in the RAS

Darshanie Ratnawalli, in Daily Mirror,  August 2018, with the title “Royal Asiatic Society (SL) needs women and diversity” … with highlighting being the work of The Editor, Thuppahi

If having a female at the helm is a sign of modernity in an organization, the Royal Asiatic Society of Sri Lanka (RASSL) was dragged into modernity in 2015. So late? I can hear you exclaiming incredulously — after all by 2015 the RASSL was 170 years old.

Yet it is true. The society fell into line with its more modern peer societies only when Dr. Hema Goonatilake made her successful bid for the presidency in 2015, amidst an unedifying display of kicking and screaming by a section of its membership.

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Revelations: Oppression of the Dalits in India via A Family History

Tariq  Ali’s essay entitled THE UNSEEABLES  in the London Review of Books Vol. 40 No. 16 · 30 August 2018   …. reviewing  Ants among Elephants: An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern India by Sujatha Gidla Daunt, 341 pp, £14.99, May, ISBN 978 1 911547 20 4

  

This is a family biography that encompasses a history rarely told: despite its longevity, caste, and caste oppression, is not a popular theme in India. Sujatha Gidla writes of poisoned lives, of disillusionment, betrayed hopes, unrequited loves, attempted escapes through alcohol and sex. What distinguishes her book is its rich mix of sociology, anthropology, history, literature and politics.

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Michelle de Kretser: From Methodist College to Global Platforms

ONE: Wikipedia Notice on Michelle de Kretser

Michelle de Kretser = born 11 November 1957 =  an Australian novelist who was born in Sri Lanka (then Ceylon), and moved to Australia in 1972 when she was 14.[1]   De Kretser was educated at Methodist College, Colombo and in Methodist College, Colombo,[2] and in Melbourne and Paris.

She worked as an editor for travel guides company Lonely Planet, and while on a sabbatical in 1999, wrote and published her first novel, The Rose Grower. Her second novel, published in 2003, The Hamilton Case was winner of the Tasmania Pacific Prize, the Encore Award (UK) and the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Southeast Asia and Pacific). Her third novel, The Lost Dog, was published in 2007. It was one of 13 books on the long list for the 2008 Man Booker Prize for fiction. From 1989 to 1992 she was a founding editor of the Australian Women’s Book Review. Her fourth novel, Questions of Travel, won several awards, including the 2013 Miles Franklin Award, the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal (ALS Gold Medal), and the 2013 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards for fiction. It was also shortlisted for the 2014 Dublin Impac Literary Award. Her 2017 novel, The Life to Come, was shortlisted for the 2018 Stella Prize.[3]

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