Category Archives: medical marvels

Murali in Support of the UWA Bio-Tech Unit Today …. Cutting-Edge Research

News Item from UWA, 9 December 2019, entitled “Cricket legend visits UWA to test wearable technology”

Sri Lankan spin bowling legend Muttiah Muralitharan (Murali) has visited The University of Western Australia for an update on the technology that cleared his unorthodox bowling action in the late 1990s, resulting in him becoming the world record holder for the most wickets taken in both Test and one-day cricket.
“I’ve been tested here (at UWA) five or six times,” Murali said. “Every time there is a problem I come here and test, so the facility year by year is improving. They are still developing, for a new generation, how to overcome these problems.”

Today  Yesterday … with Jacqui Alderson directed by Bruce Elliot

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Superstition meets Science in Early Modern Europe: Ulinka Rublack’s Path-breaking Studies

Lilo Berg, in Humboldt Kosmos  2019, pp.3033 ** where the title reads as “Witches, Fashion Fiends and Cabinet Curiosities”

Ulinka Rublack’s book about the astronomer Johannes Kepler, who defended his mother in a witchcraft trial, caused a stir. Drawing on old sources, the historian reconstructs a fascinating image of the Early Modern Era in which superstition meets science

The Historian Ulinka Rublack at work in Wolfenbüttel
The Historian Ulinka Rublack at work in Wolfenbüttel (Photo: Humboldt Foundation / Jörg Scheibe)

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Learning from Combatants Scarred by War

Kamanthi Wickramasinghe in Daily Mirror, 21 November 2019, where the title runs thus: “Ex-combatants under rehabilitation call for peace  A visit to Mihindu Seth Medura and Ranaviru Sevana”

The bloodied past of the thirty-year long conflict keeps reflecting in their memories. Having lived the greater part of their lives on battlefields, engaging in what were termed as ‘humanitarian operations’ against deafening noises emanating from blasting mortars, claymore bombs and the frequent gunshots, the physical and psychological trauma were part and parcel of their lives. While many of them succumbed to injuries, another section of this generation who require special assistance to do their day-to-day work are being well looked after. Although many of them initially sought treatment at Ranaviru Sevana based in Ragama, at present those who require further rehabilitative care are stationed at Mihindu Seth Medura in Attidiya.

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Dr Susiri Weerasekera: A Man for All Seasons

Michael Roberts

A chance finding of an old article that I had written on “dedicated medical work” on both sides of the battlefront during the last stages of the war brought vibrant memories of Dr Susiri Weerasekera into my mind. Getting to know him well after I visited the Friend-in-Need Society opposite the Gangarama at Colpetty in mid-2010, I can assure all readers that he was a man to have alongside one in adversity. We became warm friends over the years.[1] My admiration for his dedication towards humankind, his industry, patriotism and sagacity is unbounded. He is alive still I believe; but I write in the past tense because he lapsed into a state non compos mentis about two years back and I find it distressing even to seek information on his state of body and mind.

This is a valedictory memorial in several parts.

Dr Weerasekera standing 2nd from right facing us with a visiting dignitary at the FINS buildng

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For Sri Lankans: Dr David Young Honoured for His Medical Work

Item in the Sunday Times, 1 September 2019

His many friends across Sri Lanka hailed the Presidential award of the ‘Sri Lanka Ranjana’ to distinguished Australian orthopaedic surgeon Dr. David Alexander Young for his services to the country describing it as ‘well deserved’. The Presidential Awards ceremony was held at the BMICH on August 19. The Sri Lanka Ranjana is the second highest honour awarded to non-nationals for ‘praiseworthy services’ to the nation.

Lankan cricketing great Kumar Sangakkara said, “I am delighted that the efforts of Dr. David Young in his charitable endeavours in Sri Lanka are being recognized nationally. It has been a long time coming and to say it is well deserved is an understatement.” Continue reading

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A Wiradjuri Woman Medico becomes South Australia’s Rhodes Scholar for 2018

ONE: News Item from University of Adelaide: “Indigenous Doctor is Rhodes Scholar for South Australia,” 26 October 2017

Outstanding University of Adelaide medical graduate Dr Claudia Paul has become the third Australian Indigenous person to be awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, having been named the 2018 Rhodes Scholar for South Australia. Dr Paul, 24, a Wiradjuri woman from Broken Hill, will use her scholarship to undertake a Masters of International Health and Tropical Medicine at the University of Oxford from next year. The Governor of South Australia, His Excellency Hieu Van Le, AC, announced Dr Paul as the Rhodes Scholar for South Australia at a ceremony at Government House late yesterday.

Claudia Paul with Governor Hieu Van Le …. a dinky-die local with a Vietnamese refugee migrant from the 1970s … Hurray

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The Vagina: Exposing Its Myths

Helen Rumbelow, courtesy of The Australian, 19 January 2018, where the title runs “The Vagina Myths Exposed” ... with emphasis in highlights added by The Editor Thuppahi

It is nice that little boys are so proud of their penises. It’s an enthusiasm that never goes away: a lifetime bromance of “check out this little chap” swagger. Their wrinkly tube of erectile tissue gets to be a wingman, with a name, a personality and a lot of reflected glory. Could women ever feel this fantastic about their genitals?

Authors Ellen Stokken Dahl and Nina Brochmann reveal a few truths that eluded Masters, Johnson and many other experts.
Authors Ellen Stokken Dahl and Nina Brochmann reveal a few truths that eluded Masters, Johnson and many other experts.

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