Category Archives: Middle Eastern Politics

Wahhabi Ideology is the Root of Islamic Extremism

Nur Yalman, courtesy of Colombo Telegraph, where the title runs Islam, Extremism & Hypocrisy” … highlighting emphasis is that of th Editor, Thuppahi

Suicide attacks in beloved Barcelona. We are once again left aghast at the cruelty of an entire group of malevolent people. These evil acts should have no place in civilized existence. Where do they come from? What is their purpose? What is to be done? First of all we must note that these murders are part of a “Death Cult” associated with the profound radicalism deriving from an unusual Wahhabi version of Islam.

 

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Filed under accountability, Afghanistan, Al Qaeda, american imperialism, arab regimes, authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, disparagement, foreign policy, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, life stories, LTTE, Middle Eastern Politics, military strategy, nationalism, politIcal discourse, power politics, security, self-reflexivity, world events & processes

Reviewing “Ports of the Ancient Indian Ocean”

Richard Fynes,  reviewing Marie-Françoise Boussac, Jean- Françoise Salles & Jean-Baptiste (eds.) Ports of the Ancient Indian Ocean,  Delhi: Primus Books. 2016. ISBN 97893840820792  …………… in IIAS Newsletter,  Summer 2017

This edited volume delivers much more than is suggested by its title, since it includes discussions of emporia as far inland as Delhi, the time-scale covered by its articles extends from the 20th century BC to the 18th century AD, and since not only the Indian Ocean, but also the Red Sea, the Persian Gulf, the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea are discussed by the various authors. Given the wide range and disparate nature of the twenty-four papers in the volume, how should one orient oneself among them? Best to begin with Elizabeth Lambourn’s ‘Describing a Lost Camel’ – Clues for a West Asian Mercantile Networks in South Asian Maritime Trade (Tenth-Twelfth Centuries AD). The volume taken as a whole forms a contribution to the genre of world history and Lambourn provides a clear-eyed assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of that genre. Although Lambourn’s paper is primarily concerned with the two hundred years from the tenth- to the twelfth centuries AD, her masterly analysis of the sources and criticism of the various methodologies in which they are employed provide the reader with a prism with which to view the remaining papers in the volume. Lambourn begins her account with a review of the relevant archaeological and documentary evidence. It is salutary to learn just how insecure is the dating of many South Asian ceramic types and consequently of the archaeological sites whose dating has been largely derived from ceramic evidence. Lambourn notes the problems posed by pluridisciplinary character of the sources and their simultaneous use. Her paper focuses on the port of Sanjan, in the domain of the western Indian dynasty of the Rastrakuta, where, for the tenth century there is rare conjunction of evidence from archaeology, Arabic geographical writings and Indian epigraphy. Her discussion is rich both in evidence and insight, and she gives due acknowledgment to the work of Ranabir Chakravarti, whose work has led scholars to reformulate the questions they ask of the sources. Lambourn’s findings lead her to speculate on the nature of world history and the relationship between micro- and macro history, as she expresses dissatisfaction that she is “left with an eclectic collection of small insights and few satisfactory larger narratives.” Such honest appraisals of the conclusions of one’s research invite further questions and are thus a stimulant to further research. Continue reading

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Filed under centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, ethnicity, growth pole, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, Indian religions, Indian traditions, landscape wondrous, Middle Eastern Politics, population, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, transport and communications, unusual people, world events & processes

Police Counter-Terrorism in UK via Hannah Stuart

Policy Exchange’s Hannah Stuart discusses police counter-terrorism operations on BBC Radio 5 Live……..May 2, 2017 …. https://policyexchange.org.uk/news/hannah-stuart-5live/

Following the recent terrorism related arrests, Hannah Stuart, Policy Exchange Co-Head of Security and Extremism, discusses police counter-terrorism operations on BBC Radio 5 Live:

Hannah Stuart on BBC Radio 5 Live

About Us = Policy Exchange is the UK’s leading think tank. As an educational charity our mission is to develop and promote new policy ideas which deliver better public services, a stronger society and a more dynamic economy.

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Filed under accountability, atrocities, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, legal issues, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, politIcal discourse, power politics, world events & processes, zealotry

Bomb Blast as Ideological Assertion

Raffaello Pantucci, courtesy of The Telegraph, 23 May 2017, where the title isCars and knives are easier to use, but bombs will always be central to terrorist thinking” **

Terrorism has a predictable brutality to it. And yet, the idea of a bombing is something that still surprises us when it happens. The attack in Manchester in some ways appears a flashback to a different time when the terrorists we worried about detonated bombs, rather than using vehicles as rams or stabbing people. The reality is that terrorism’s only constant is its desire to shock and kill. For any group or ideology, the fundamental point is to make yourself heard as dramatically as possible. Groups and individuals will use whatever tools they have to gain that attention.

 The successful use of a bomb is unusual among recent terror attacks CREDIT: JOEL GOODMAN/LNP

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Filed under accountability, arab regimes, atrocities, cultural transmission, historical interpretation, immigration, Islamic fundamentalism, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, politIcal discourse, power politics, self-reflexivity, suicide bombing, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, trauma, vengeance, world events & processes

Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Heed Raffaello Pantucci on Homegrown Jihadism

Greg Sheridanin The Australian, 24 May 2017, where the title is “Manchester Terror Attack: Endless Cycle of Jihadism” … with emphasis by highlights being the intervention of The Editor, Thuppahi

A crowd of mostly teenage girls, as innocent as young people can be, at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester. It’s everything jihadist terrorists — from Islamic State to al-Qa’ida to the Taliban — hate most about the West, and everything that declares the innocence of youth and the pleasure of music in public spaces. The savage attack — believed to have been carried out by a lone male suicide bomber, leaving at least 22 dead, 60 injured and more fatalities likely — demonstrates the stark realities of the terrorism war. First, the terror threat in Western societies is not diminishing. Every so often the West gets weary of the terror story, develops terrorism fatigue and wants to declare the peak of the threat has passed. This is not true.

 Police and fans close to the Manchester Arena yesterday after reports of explosions. Picture: Getty Images Continue reading

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Filed under accountability, asylum-seekers, atrocities, australian media, economic processes, governance, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, landscape wondrous, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, patriotism, politIcal discourse, power politics, security, self-reflexivity, vengeance, world events & processes

Has Assad been Tarred with a Sarin Brush? A False Flag Stratagem at Play?

 in Daily Mirror, 8 May 2017,  with title   “False-flag chemical weapons attack: Re-play of an old US ploy to smash Syria? – See more at:

As the fallout of the April 4th chemical weapons attack in Khan Sheikhun in Syria continues to unfold, contradictory reports on the incident have produced more questions than answers as to what really happened.  The only certainty seems to be that sarin or a similar poison was used. This was confirmed by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons according to Reuters, but OPCW was not mandated to assign blame.

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Filed under accountability, american imperialism, arab regimes, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, news fabrication, photography, politIcal discourse, propaganda, Responsibility to Protect or R2P, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, trauma, truth as casualty of war, war crimes, war reportage, world events & processes

A Martyr for Allah — Jabar, the Assassin, in Sydney

  Rhiam Deutrom, in The Australian, 5 May 2017, where the title runs “Cheng killer Farhad Jabar feted as ‘martyr’ by accused co-plotters”

Farhad Jabar was celebrated as a “warrior” and a “martyr” in the days after the teenager shot unarmed NSW police finance employee Curtis Cheng in the back of the head, outside the Parramatta Police Headquarters, a court has heard. Farhad, killed by special constables during the attack in 2015, was allegedly given an illegal pistol by the men at the centre of a committal hearing this week in the Downing Centre Local Court. Talal Alameddine, 24, Mustafa Dirani, 23, Milad Atai, 21 and Raban Alou, 19, are facing charges relating to planning a terrorist act and supplying the .38 calibre pistol to Farhad. All but Mr Alou were present at court this week, dressed in prison-issued green tracksuits and seated together in the dock.

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Filed under australian media, cultural transmission, female empowerment, Islamic fundamentalism, jihad, landscape wondrous, legal issues, life stories, martyrdom, Middle Eastern Politics, politIcal discourse, power politics, psychological urges, religious nationalism, self-reflexivity, terrorism, world events & processes, zealotry