Category Archives: modernity & modernization

Ambedkar’s Criticism of Caste Divisions now available in Sinhala

Basil Fernando

 

A Sinhala Translation of Dr. B. R. Ambedkar’s book Annihilation of Caste is now available. It is entitled Kulaya Mulin Uputa Demeema” The book has been translated into an easy, readable language by Osadhi Nayantara Gunasekera and published by the Asian Human Rights Commission. The book is now available in bookshops in Sri Lanka. Annihilation of Caste is one of the finest political works produced in Indian political literature. This book was originally written as the text for a keynote address. It was for a gathering of a society called Enlightened Hindus and published as a book in 1936. Ever since, this book has been translated into almost all Indian languages and into many other international languages such as English, French and others.

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The Flag of Convenience as Potential Jackpot for Sri Lanka’s Ports?

Capt A. Banerjee, Sunday Observer, 23 April, 2017, where the title was slightly i different

In the last 2 years Sri Lanka has taken considerable efforts and is slowly moving towards her desire to be the next Maritime Hub.The government and other maritime stakeholders are trying their best to put their heads together in realizing this dream. I too would like to contribute towards this initiative and feel that so much can be achieved if we can nurture this “golden goose” called Flag of Convenience. I hope with this article I am able to make you realize the great opportunity that lies ahead.

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Galle Face Hotel in Australian Frontlines after Facelift

Phil Hawkes, in The Australian, 19 April 2017,  with the titleGalle Face Hotel gracious reminder of foregone era”

It’s 1982 and I’m in Colombo, Sri Lanka, at a travel conference. We rock up at the portico of the legendary Galle Face Hotel in a decrepit 10-seat minibus that the organisers managed to provide for 12 delegates. Hardly the coolest of ways to arrive at this heritage-listed reminder of British colonial days. Where’s the fleet of vintage Rollers? But there’s Kuttan the doorman, splendid in his unique white uniform and sporting his trademark handlebar moustache, welcoming us as if we’re royalty. He is used to greeting guests such as Lord Louis Mountbatten, Princess Elizabeth, Jawaharlal Nehru and other famous people, but his welcome to us is just the same. Feeling like celebrities, we forget about the minibus. Kuttan was a recognisable character at the Galle Face Hotel for 72 years, surely a world record. He died in 2014 at age 94, much honoured by colleagues and those guests whose lives he touched. Now his tradition is carried on by PB Rathnayaka, whose tenure is a mere 51 years with another “rich and famous” list to recall, including Fidel Castro and Indira Gandhi, and more than a few Australian cricketers.

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Filed under art & allure bewitching, australian media, landscape wondrous, life stories, modernity & modernization, pilgrimages, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, world affairs

Remembering Ravi Jayewardene as Man and Founder of the STF

Item in Sunday Observer, 9 April 2017

Today, Sri Lanka  pays her solemn condolences to the late Ravi Jayewardene. He was a pilot, and later went on to make significant contributions in the corporate sector. Perhaps, the greatest legacy he leaves behind is the Special Task Force of the Sri Lanka Police. He was the daring visionary who used his prudent mind to foresee the need for a specialized unit within the Police Department at that time, in order to engage in counter terrorism operations and mitigate threats to national security.

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Point Pedro Institute of Development: Its Academic Ouput

SELECTED PAST PEER REVIEWED SCHOLARLY KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTS OF THE PPID

Muttukrishna Sarvananthan, Jeyapraba Suresh & Anushani Alagarajah, 2017, “Feminism, nationalism, and labour in post-civil war Northern Province of Sri Lanka”, Development in Practice, 27:1, 122-128.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09614524.2017.1283785
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09614524.2017.1257566

Muttukrishna Sarvananthan, 2016, “Elusive Economic Peace Dividend: all that glitters is not gold”, GeoJournal, 81:4, 571-596. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10708-015-9637-3

Muttukrishna Sarvananthan, 2015, “Impediments to Women in Post-Civil War Economic Growth in Sri Lanka”, South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management, Special Issue on Gender (in)equalities in South Asia, 2:1, 12-36. http://hrm.sagepub.com/content/2/1/12?etoc

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Face Our Future: Jihadist Offshoots and Continuing Maelstrom in Middle East

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Anguish as Empowerment … and A Path to Retribution

Michael Roberts, courtesy of Colombo Telegraph where it is presented with a different title ….  https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/histrionic-voice-as-spark-for-ethnic-violence-political-extremism/

Anguish and grief are powerful emotions that can contort and wrack a body. While ‘suggesting’ helplessness, the anguish that engulfs a person can also empower that person … and others connected to that person by commonalities of interest/emotion. In this manner anguish can transcend obstacles, generate waves of bitterness and swell into paths of retributory hate and punishment. The ‘little’ drops of tears can swell metaphorically into ‘waves’ – and even inspire enraged mobs (mostly male) bent on punishing the purported root of the tears, a recalcitrant Other, an enemy family or “community” deemed to be the cause of that expressive anguish or deemed to have transcended local norms. In southern Lanka that community can be a neighbouring caste grouping or ethnic group or religious group (Muslim Moor,[1] Hindu, Buddhist, Christian).

Let me highlight the argument by presenting an unusual juxtaposition.

  1. Expressive Grief displayed by a Sri Lankan Tamil woman at a protest demonstration before David Cameron by persons whose kin have been missing in the course of Eelam War IV

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