Category Archives: performance

Madras Murder Most Foul

Benjamin Golby,  courtesy of  ESPNs The Cricket Monthly, May 2017, where it is entitled  Madras machinations”” .

  

In Madras the umpire was murdered and it made us all uneasy. If this was the sort of place where umpires got murdered, then what chance had a handful of foreign cricketers? And without an umpire, who would enforce the rules? Who would give people out or let them stay in?

Foul murder is a constant delight of cricket’s fiction. Ted Dexter’s ghostwritten Testkill has a left-arm Australian bowler crumple dead mid-Ashes delivery. Carolyn Morwood’s female first-class cricketer sleuth, Marlo Shaw, relaxes with a net mid-murder investigation. Jock Serong’s The Rules of Backyard Cricket, from 2016, features a Warne-esque anti-hero bound and gagged in a car boot at the Australian captain’s behest.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under cricket for amity, cultural transmission, elephant tales, ethnicity, heritage, landscape wondrous, legal issues, life stories, performance, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, unusual people

James Taylor, Tea and Empire in Victorian Ceylon

“Tea and empire. James Taylor in Victorian Ceylon ” by Angela McCarthy and Tom Devine … is now in print,  July 2017, Manchester University Press, 272 pp, ISBN: 978-1-5261-1905, Price: £25.00

 

This book brings to life for the first time the remarkable story of James Taylor, ‘father of the Ceylon tea enterprise’ in the nineteenth century. Publicly celebrated in Sri Lanka for his efforts in transforming the country’s economy and shaping the world’s drinking habits, Taylor died in disgrace and remains unknown to the present day in his native Scotland. Using a unique archive of Taylor’s letters written over a forty-year period, Angela McCarthy and Tom Devine provide an unusually detailed reconstruction of a British planter’s life in Asia at the high noon of empire. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under British colonialism, commoditification, communal relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, historical interpretation, island economy, land policies, landscape wondrous, life stories, performance, politIcal discourse, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, Tamil migration, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, world events & processes

Yunupingu dies at 46. Devastating Loss for World Music

I have heard him play and sing at Womadelaide and have many of his tapes to stir me with his haunting music and lyrics. The world will sorely miss this blind Aboriginal artiste from the Yolngu people whose heart and music reached beyond his clan. Michael Roberts

Acclaimed indigenous musician Dr G Yunupingu dies aged 46

The world acclaimed blind indigenous music artist Dr G Yunupingu has died aged 46 at Royal Darwin Hospital. Dr Yunupingu’s record label, Skinnyfish, posted a brief statement on Facebook on Wednesday morning remembering Dr Yunupingu as “one of the most important figures in Australian music history”. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under art & allure bewitching, Australian culture, australian media, life stories, performance, unusual people

Fashioning Sri Lanka’s Development: A Retrospective Overview

Godfrey Gunatilleke, being the final chapter entitled  “Hindsight and Retrospect – A Brief Commentary” in a new book Towards a Sri Lankan Model of Development, 2017 Marga Institute, ISBN 978-955-582-134-6 ….publications@margasrilanka.org

 

Introduction

“History has many cunning passages, contrived corridors”  This line from Eliot’s Gerontion is a good  starting  point to begin reflecting on Sri Lanka’s development after independence .  Retracing the development path that Sri Lanka took and pausing at every twist and turn to ask “What if we took another turn?” is always a fascinating  exercise . How useful it is in guiding us in our future actions is another matter. There are always lessons to be drawn from the successes and failures of the past. But when this is done we need to recognize the inherent limitations of an effort to learn from the past and project past trends to the future.  Eliot as a poet and Schumpeter as an economist found knowledge derived from past experience to be of limited worth in predicting how the future would unfold and enabling us to take control of it.  Eliot pointed out  that the past imposes a pattern and can falsify one’s vision of the emerging future as  “the pattern is new in every moment and every moment is a shocking valuation of all that we have been”   Schumpeter perceived how innovations and discoveries which were not  foreseen led to historic and fundamental changes  and  based his model of growth on the “creative destruction”of the past . Their insights about the “unpredictability” of the future has important implications and challenges for development policy and planning. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, commoditification, economic processes, governance, growth pole, historical interpretation, island economy, landscape wondrous, legal issues, life stories, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, security, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, transport and communications, welfare & philanthophy, working class conditions, world events & processes

Rakhita and Senel: Transforming Lives

A SUNDAY TIMES Feature, 23 July 2017 entitled “Young and Unafraid,”… http://www.sundaytimes.lk/170723/plus/young-and-unafraid-251199.html

A month ago two young Sri Lankans were in London to receive the Queen’s Young Leaders Award. Established in 2014, the programme is aimed at discovering, supporting and encouraging exceptional young people between the ages of 18-29 across the Comonwealth for their contribution to their communities. This year, 21-year-old Rakitha Malewana and 26-year-old Senel Wanniarachchi were honoured for their work with HIV/AIDS and social activism respectively.

   Rakitha Malewana, raising awareness about HIV/AIDs. Pix by Indika handuwala

  Social activist Senel Wanniarachchi. Pic by Sameera Weerasekera

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under charitable outreach, cultural transmission, economic processes, education, female empowerment, heritage, landscape wondrous, life stories, medical marvels, performance, politIcal discourse, rehabilitation, self-reflexivity, social justice, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, voluntary workers, welfare & philanthophy

Inspirations from Tamara Kunanayakam … and Incisive Criticisms of Yahapaalanaya

Lasanda Kurukulasuriya 

Tamara Kunanayakam was the recipient of ‘Inspirational Woman of the Year’Award in this year’s ‘Top 50 Professional and Career Women Awards’ organized by Women in Management, in partnership with the In ternational Finance Corporation of the World Bank Group. The 50 winners from Sri Lanka and the Maldives received their awards at a glittering ceremony held at Hotel Taj Samudra on Friday. Ms. Kunanayakam, best known for her defence of Sri Lanka’s independence and sovereignty as Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva 2011-2012 when a resolution was brought against the country at the Human Rights Council, said “the fact that I won this award, for me is a recognition of the values and principles I stood for.” The Daily Mirror  talked to her about the less-known aspects of her background and career. Excerpts from the interview:

Tamara Kunanayakam receives the award from Dr. Rohantha Athukorala, Chairman – Panel of Judges

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under accountability, american imperialism, economic processes, female empowerment, governance, historical interpretation, island economy, Left politics, legal issues, life stories, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, self-reflexivity, social justice, sri lankan society, unusual people, world affairs

Breakthrough Heart Transplant at Kandy Hospital: An Almsgiving beyond Life

Kumudini Hettiarachchi, in  Sunday Times, 16 July 2017, reporting on  the human saga behind a trailblazing medical feat in Sri Lanka under the title  “A new heart begins to beat  

 Overjoyed is H.A. Wijaya Kumarasiri from a village in Anuradhapura. His Sudu, with her new heart beating strongly within, had opened her eyes and given him a smile that morning, as he murmured endearments to her. We meet him the same day, Wednesday, at noon as he lingers outside the Kandy Teaching Hospital’s Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU), awaiting another glimpse of his wife.
The heart transplant team at work in Operating Theatre B. Pix by Priyantha Wickramarachch

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under charitable outreach, cultural transmission, heritage, landscape wondrous, life stories, medical marvels, meditations, modernity & modernization, performance, religiosity, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, unusual people