Category Archives: photography

Infantry Warfare and the Final Phase of Eelam War IV: Where Laymen Blunder into Infantile Assessments

Michael Roberts

 In his typically feisty style Mark Salter has taken issue with the characterization of a statement in his To End a Civil War as “infantile”  (within an article based on the Lt Col Gash files[1]). [This protest is now reproduced at the end of this essay as well]. Salter’s assertion is from an UTHR report which in turn is based on appraisals provided by Tamil civilians who survived the last stages of the war. Here I address both Salter and Rajan Hoole, a friend of mine and the central figure behind the exhaustive 2009 UTHR reports.

Sri Lankan Tamil civilians arrive to a government-controlled area after fleeing territory controlled by the LTTE separatist rebels in Puthukkudiyirippu…Sri Lankan Tamil civilians arrive to a government-controlled area after fleeing territory controlled by the Liberation Tamil Tigers of Eelam (LTTE) separatist rebels in Puthukkudiyirippu, northeast Sri Lanka, March 26, 2009. Pictures taken March 26, 2009. REUTERS/Stringer (SRI LANKA POLITICS CONFLICT IMAGE OF THE DAY TOP PICTURE)

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, american imperialism, authoritarian regimes, conspiracies, discrimination, doctoring evidence, Eelam, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, life stories, LTTE, military strategy, news fabrication, photography, politIcal discourse, power politics, prabhakaran, Rajapaksa regime, refugees, security, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil civilians, Tamil Tiger fighters, the imaginary and the real, trauma, truth as casualty of war, UN reports, unusual people, vengeance, war crimes, war reportage, world events & processes

Talking to Gideon Haigh about Kerry Packer and The Cricket War

ESPN interview with Gideon Haigh at http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/23408427/story-gideon-haigh-story-packer-affair

 

THIS is a story you must listen to. It is not only about cricket, but also about commercial rights, its politics and the tale of a revolutionary transformation of the pictorial technology presenting cricket to its followers on TV. Michael Roberts Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, commoditification, democratic measures, economic processes, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, performance, photography, politIcal discourse, power politics, unusual people, world events & processes

Vale Lester James Peiris: Pathfinder for Sinhala Cinema

Meera Srinivasan, in The Hindu, 30 April 2018, where the title reads  Sri Lankan filmmaker Lester James Peiris provided a realistic portrayal of rural Sinhalese”

Renowned Sri Lankan film maker and a national icon Lester James Peiris, credited with revolutionalising Sinhala cinema in the 1950s with a strong local flavour and indigenous style, passed away in Colombo on Sunday. He was 99.

A contemporary of Satyajit Ray, Peiris is regarded the “father of Sinhala cinema”. He won critical acclaim in the island and outside for his work that spanned five decades. His debut Rekava (Line of Destiny), made in 1956, is considered pathbreaking for its realistic portrayal of the ethos of the rural Sinhalese, in a newly-independent Ceylon. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under art & allure bewitching, cultural transmission, education, heritage, historical interpretation, life stories, modernity & modernization, performance, photography, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, unusual people

Maj-Genl Holmes deciphers the Eelam Wars

Major General John Holmes:  EXPERT MILITARY REPORT, 28 March 2015

  •  His page numbers are in RED on the left bottom of each page … followed by a line to indicate the end of that page
  • His FOOTNOTE REFERENCES at the bottom of some pages are presented in purple italics

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under gordon weiss, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Indian Ocean politics, law of armed conflict, legal issues, life stories, LTTE, military strategy, news fabrication, Paranagama Report, photography, politIcal discourse, power politics, prabhakaran, propaganda, Rajapaksa regime, security, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, suicide bombing, Tamil civilians, tamil refugees, Tamil Tiger fighters, the imaginary and the real, trauma, truth as casualty of war, UN reports, unusual people, war reportage, world events & processes

The Hidden Natural Treasures of Sinharaja Forest, Lanka: Snaps in 2014

Roshan Quintus

I was invited to participate in a  YZA Field trip to Sinharaja in 2014 as I was working on a wildlife protection related campaign. YZA office bearers and senior members conducted this field trip. Professional veteran naturalists and environmentalists Messrs Jagath Gunawardane, Uditha Hettige, Isuru De Zoysa, Pubudu  Weerarathne, and Parami Vidyarathne were among the resource persons.

A NOTE by Michael Roberts:  VISIT http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/profile/284224/ for toher dimensions of Roshan’s ‘work’.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under art & allure bewitching, heritage, landscape wondrous, life stories, photography, sri lankan society, unusual people

Douma: Terror from Many Sides and Confusing Tales. Hypoxia not Gas?

Robert Fisk, in The Independent, 15 April 2018with this titleThe search for truth in the rubble of Douma – and one doctor’s doubts over the chemical attack”

This is the story of a town called Douma, a ravaged, stinking place of smashed apartment blocks – and of an underground clinic whose images of suffering allowed three of the Western world’s most powerful nations to bomb Syria last week. There’s even a friendly doctor in a green coat who, when I track him down in the very same clinic, cheerfully tells me that the “gas” videotape which horrified the world – despite all the doubters – is perfectly genuine.

an image from another source -viz. The Guardian

War stories, however, have a habit of growing darker. For the same 58-year old senior Syrian doctor then adds something profoundly uncomfortable: the patients, he says, were overcome not by gas but by oxygen starvation in the rubbish-filled tunnels and basements in which they lived, on a night of wind and heavy shelling that stirred up a dust storm.

Continue reading

1 Comment

April 19, 2018 · 2:03 pm

Eastern Great Egret

Eastern Great Egret ….. Ardea modesta……Ardeidae

One of Australia’s most elegant birds, the snowy-white Eastern Great Egret is often seen wading in a range of wetlands, from lakes, rivers and swamps to estuaries, salt marsh and intertidal mudflats. They usually feed in shallow water, standing and waiting for fish, frogs, insects and other small aquatic creatures to appear before stabbing them with its long, yellow bill. They also walk slowly through the water, on the lookout for prey. Large fish are eaten with difficulty, and are often snatched from the bill of the egret by raptors.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under heritage, landscape wondrous, photography, travelogue