Category Archives: pilgrimages

Scaling The Heights of Everest: Johann Peries becomes Second Lankan to do this

Editorial Item in Newsin Asia, 22  May 2018, … https://newsin.asia/johann-peries-becomes-second-lankan-to-climb-everest/

Sri Lanka’s Johann Peries successfully climbed the 29,030 feet Mount Everest at 5.55 a.m in Nepal time on Tuesday, his support team in Colombo said.

 Johann Peries and Jayanthi Kuru Uthumpala, the two Sri Lankans who have climbed the Everest

This was his second attempt. Peries now becomes the second Sri Lankan to summit Mt. Everest after Jayanthi Kuru Utumpala did it in 2016. He left the Camp at 4.00p.m last evening. His earlier attempt in 2016 was unsuccessful when his oxygen tank failed 400 meters from the summit.

****  ****

About Us

NewsIn.Asia is a SouthAsian website, operating from Colombo and accessed by readers worldwide. It offers its readers timely, indepth and comprehensive coverage of South Asian news, views and analyses. The site is active on social media such as Facebook and Twitter where it has thousands of followers. Within months after its launch, in July 2016, NewsIn.Asia has become a popular web portal in Sri Lanka and many South Asian countries where it has gained a reputation of unbiased reporting amongst its readers. The areas covered by NewsIn.Asia include politics, business, sports, cinema, off beat, food and travel.

Contact Information
NewsIn.Asia
No. 10, Adamally Place,
Colombo 04
Sri Lanka

Editor
Jamila Husain
jamila@newsin.asia
0779143404

Associate Editor
Shabbir Sajjadhussain
shabbir@newsin.asia

Associate Editor
Naqiya Aliasgar
naqiya@newsin.asia

Leave a comment

Filed under life stories, pilgrimages, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, travelogue, unusual people

Ceylon, Percy Fawcett and the Quest for the Lost City of Zed

Vinod Moonesinghe, courtesy of Roar Life, where the title is “The Lost City of Zed: Lanka’s Link”

In March 2018, the magazine Nature Communications published an article by a team of archaeologists from Exeter University. The team had been investigating possible ancient settlements in the Amazon’s upper Tapajós Basin, using a variety of modern techniques, including satellite imagery. They discovered 81 sites from the pre-Columbian era (about 1250-1500 A.D.).

 Shooting the giant anaconda, the cover of Expedition Fawcett, written by Brian Fawcett

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under cultural transmission, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, pilgrimages, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, travelogue, unusual people, wild life, world events & processes

When Nature Swallows Settlement: Ross Island in the Indian Ocean

Neelima Vallangi, 18 March 2018, “http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20180308-a-ghost-island-in-the-middle-of-the-indian-ocean … where the original title is “A Ghost Island in the Middle of the Indian Ocean”

Situated in the Bay of Bengal, India’s Andaman and Nicobar Islands are an isolated group of 572 tropical islands, of which only 38 are currently inhabited. Nautically located closer to South East Asia than India, they are known for stunning beaches, thriving marine life, rich coral reefs and largely undisturbed primary forests. But beyond the idyllic views lie a dark past. (Credit: Neelima Vallangi)

Eerie remains of a colonial settlement

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, British colonialism, economic processes, environmental degradation, heritage, historical interpretation, life stories, pilgrimages, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

A Corpse That has Healed and Linked Japanese and Aussies

Ian  McPhedran, in The Australian, 23 April 2018, where the title reads “Anzac Day: for Jack Hart, battle within was more ferocious than hand-to-hand combat in war”

Jack Hart went to war — twice. The first time, he survived critical injuries deep in the jungle. The second time, it was the psychological injuries that nearly did him in, says his former wife, Jean.

Izumi and Bill Hart with a copy of a monograph about Jack Hart written by Bill’s mother, Jean, and the signed World War II flag returned to a Japanese peace museum.
Izumi and Bill Hart with a copy of a monograph about Jack Hart written by Bill’s mother, Jean, and the signed World War II flag returned to a Japanese peace museum.

John Edward Hart was born in Sydney in 1923, enlisted in 1941 and was posted to Rabaul on the island of New Britain as an anti-aircraft gunner attached to the 1400-strong Lark Force in August 1941. Five months later, the Japanese captured Rabaul. Hart was among a small number of Diggers who escaped. Most of Lark Force were either killed in the battle, captured and executed, or died later when an American submarine sank the Japanese prison ship Montevideo Maru. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, charitable outreach, cultural transmission, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, pilgrimages, reconciliation, rehabilitation, religiosity, self-reflexivity, tolerance, travelogue, unusual people

Escaping to Sri Lanka on Holiday

Mal Chenu in Sunday Mail, 15 April 2018 ….. where the title runs “Why Aussies love Sri Lanka Right Now”

Venetian adventurer Marco Polo described Sri Lanka as “the finest island of its size in all the world”. Sure, that was in the 13th century and young Marco hadn’t seen Tasmania but the myriad wonders of this tropical nouveau-paradise are as varied and exotic as the scents in the spice gardens of Matale and Kegalle. In short, Sri Lanka is a potpourri of unpredictable pleasures. Once a flyover location, eschewed by travellers for years because of civil war, Sri Lanka is fast emerging from its travails, posting sharp rises in tourism since the 26-year conflict ended in 2009.

Sigiriya is a World Heritage site

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under art & allure bewitching, australian media, Buddhism, cultural transmission, economic processes, elephant tales, heritage, historical interpretation, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, photography, pilgrimages, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, tourism, transport and communications, travelogue, wild life

Soccer: World Cup Trophy ends its Journey

YOU TUBE …. with Felicity George and Edgar Watson on Stage

VISIT https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/1621d38324369154?projector=1

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, commoditification, cultural transmission, pilgrimages, world affairs

Animal Ways

a hermit crab at Mirissa

  a copulating pair of Toque Macaque at the Peradeniya Botanical Gardens …. maybe 7-to-8 acts of penetration within the minute…not rape – just a willing partner

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under elephant tales, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, pilgrimages, pulling the leg, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, tourism, travelogue, wild life, world affairs