Category Archives: racist thinking

Anti-Christian Zealotry in Sri Lanka- Dangerous Signs

Ruki Fernando, in Sunday Observer, 21 April 2019, where the title is “Christians and Religious Freedoms under Fire” **

From February 3 to April 14 this year, across Sri Lanka, there has been some sort of disruption against a Christian worship service every Sunday – on 11 successive Sundays to be specific.Christians in Sri Lanka suffer violations of their right to religion and belief regularly, but most incidents do not make it to the news – or even to the Twittersphere. But the attack on the Methodist Church Centre in Anuradhapura, last Sunday, which was also Palm Sunday, a day of religious significance for Christians, was widely reported because of the forthright personal testimony and determined efforts of the President of the Methodist Conference, Bishop Asiri Perera, who had experienced the attack first hand.

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under atrocities, Buddhism, communal relations, conspiracies, cultural transmission, discrimination, ethnicity, historical interpretation, legal issues, life stories, politIcal discourse, power politics, racist thinking, religiosity, self-reflexivity, Sri Lankan scoiety, terrorism, vengeance, zealotry

Paranoid Fears and Ethnic Supremacy: From Christchurch to Sri Lanka and Beyond

Lakshman Gunasekara, in  Horizons, 31 March 2019, with this title “Supremacism: harnessing myth,  paranoia”

…Before we deal with the fertility rates, we must deal with both the invaders within our lands and the invaders that seek to enter our lands…declares the mass murderer of Christchurch in his 80 plus page long ‘The Great Replacement’ political declaration which he had posted on the internet. Does this declaration by a deadly mass killer ring a bell to us, Sri Lankans?

Readers only need to refer back through our own post-colonial national discourses to come up with loads of this stuff. Our news media and other publishing archives and records will reveal the sheer volume of similar such statements expressed in political party rhetoric, nationalist activist arguments, and even in parliamentary debate over the decades since our island society won back its freedom from European colonialism. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, conspiracies, disparagement, electoral structures, fundamentalism, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, Left politics, legal issues, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, power politics, psychological urges, racist thinking, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, the imaginary and the real, truth as casualty of war, world events & processes

The Christchurch Killer’s Dungeon of a Mind

ONE = Greg Sheridan: “A Manifesto for a Dark Age,” in The Australian, 23 March 2019

The manifesto of Brenton Tarrant, the alleged Christchurch gunman, displays an extreme contemporary embodiment of six historical trends. It is the mirror in morality, personality and rhetoric of the archetypal Islamic State terrorist. It is the inheritor of the most extreme traditions of white racism, both the North American tradition and its Germanic cousin. Its outlook is crippled by an addiction to conspiracy theories of a type long familiar, especially in the modern US.

Brenton Tarrant with his father Rodney.

Brenton Tarrant as a youth with his father Rodney n 2006

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, conspiracies, cultural transmission, discrimination, ethnicity, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, meditations, politIcal discourse, psychological urges, racist thinking, security, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes

Christchurch Hate Killings and the Hate Arising from the Digana Contretemps: Editorial Reflections

Editorial in the Sunday Observer of Sri Lanka, 17 March 2019, entitledChristchurch and our own national experience”

Blood is being spilt with the claim of protecting one’s own ‘flesh and blood.’ It happened last Friday in Christchurch, in usually quiet New Zealand; it has happened in this country in sustained internal conflict over decades; and, it has happened all over the world throughout human history.

The gloom instilled by this litany is, however, dispelled by the bright success of societies in overcoming violence between communities, in managing conflict and, channelling social energies toward civilisational attainment. Happy are the societies that are warmly inclusive, that bravely embrace differentiation and unfamiliarity. Happy are those who celebrate co-existence and avoid or resolve the disruptions between groups, between people. Continue reading

6 Comments

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, communal relations, cultural transmission, ethnicity, heritage, immigration, landscape wondrous, life stories, politIcal discourse, racist thinking, reconciliation, religiosity, riots and pogroms, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, trauma, unusual people, vengeance, violence of language, welfare & philanthophy, world events & processes

From Individual Atom to God Almighty

From Individual Atom to God Almighty

Michael Roberts

 With the growth of Western civilization from the 16th century onwards and its sweeping sway in the world today, we have seen the power vested in the individual atom known as “man” in its non-gendered sense. Individuation, and its blood-brother, egoism, is the warp and woof of everyday living in most parts of the world and is most pronounced in the states identified with the “West.”

Christchurch killer in court

It is imprinted and glorified in many sports competitions: say, surfing, marathon-running, motor-cycling, gymnastics, et cetera. Its imprint has been expanded by new technology such as skateboards and fancy bikes. There are also age-old sports which sustain the emphasis on intense individual action: for instance, fishing and hunting.

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under accountability, australian media, commoditification, cultural transmission, economic processes, historical interpretation, Islamic fundamentalism, legal issues, life stories, martyrdom, meditations, politIcal discourse, psychological urges, racist thinking, religiosity, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes

Deciphering Chauvinism through Incidents of Confrontation

Michael Roberts

In recently facing up to internet challenges and clarifying the term “chauvinism,” I proceeded at a general level and presented definitions within a comparative framework that brought the concepts of “racism” and “tribalism” into our framework of analysis.[1] I now provide instances of ethno-religious confrontation from Sri Lankan history that illustrate this phenomenon.

Pics from Gerald Peiris 2017

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under British colonialism, Buddhism, caste issues, communal relations, cultural transmission, discrimination, disparagement, economic processes, fundamentalism, governance, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Islamic fundamentalism, landscape wondrous, language policies, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, nationalism, patriotism, political demonstrations, politIcal discourse, power sharing, racist thinking, riots and pogroms, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, vengeance, violence of language, working class conditions, world events & processes

Addressing  “Chauvinism” and  Primacy in Modern Lanka

Michael Roberts

After I presented an old article in which I displayed and criticised the rantings of a Sinhala extremist named Chand Wijeywickrema (a Peradeniya graduate of my vintage), I was directly challenged by two Facebook members to clarify my depiction of Wijey (and like others) as “chauvinists” – or, in this situation, as Sinhala chauvinists.

Rather than heading immediately for a dictionary, I decided to explore the issue by raising the question with my tennis mates, mostly Australians from university or professional backgrounds and thus from the West. The term “chauvinism” generated puzzlement. It was not part of their immediate political vocabulary and a few of them referred to “male chauvinism” – immediately referring to recent trends of female emancipation and the feminist criticism of male dominance.

Ah, dominance! That is one clue in our assessment of the term.

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, communal relations, cultural transmission, disparagement, ethnicity, fundamentalism, governance, historical interpretation, language policies, modernity & modernization, nationalism, patriotism, politIcal discourse, power politics, racist thinking, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, vengeance, violence of language, world events & processes, zealotry