Category Archives: social justice

AHANNA Programme launched by SL Government and Police

Addressing Sinhala-Muslim and Other Communal Tensions

Please find attached hereto a press release dated 09 August 2018, issued by the Department of Government Information with regard to the launching of the “Ahanna” programme, which aims to promote reconciliation and mutual trust among communities.  This programme, initiated by the Ministry of Finance & Mass Media and the Secretariat for Coordinating Reconciliation Mechanisms (SCRM), will be implemented island-wide.

The videos of the programmes held in Dehiwala and Panadura on 08 and 09 August 2018, could be viewed via the following links and are available on the Ministry’s Youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jW0YOnOnAxU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2us1xFetVaw&t=15s

Spend time on listening to this broadcast in Sinhala ….

LISTEN & WATCH a SAF RUGBY CEREMONY = YouTube – 848f4d836bc7a643 – 2

ALSO LISTEN TO Kishani’s DANNO BUDUNGE  = https://www.google.com.au/search?q=kishani+danno+budunge&rlz=1C1CHZL_enAU745AU745&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=fmBt4znKeKBT6M%253A%252CNkysJFNXc0W7eM%252C_&usg=AFrqEzc3I66fuGKioDHB-2WzG7BbW6-PAA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiinZThnuLcAhWDjLwKHUjaBiYQ9QEwCnoECAMQBA#imgrc=yv7BxEnTyz6I1M:

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Accusers Accused — by Lord Michael Naseby

Item in Daily Mirror, 9 July 2018

Baron Lord Naseby said both the UK and the US were guilty of atrocities and that the two countries should inform the UN Human Rights Commission to withdraw the resolution against Sri Lanka. Lord Naseby, the President of the All Party British Sri Lanka Parliamentary Group, said this after reading the UK Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee report published on June 28.

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Facing Palihakkara: Foreign Judges on Homeland Soil?

Darshanie Ratnawallie in Daily Mirror, 13 June 2018, with the title reading “Diplomacy and Foreign Judges”

Could there be a keener pleasure than to sit around a fire and discuss diplomacy with a diplomat? Of course, there is no fire; just coffee, and that only in plastic cups, which nevertheless provides the fire, inside, instead of outside, but with the same cheering and relaxing power.

  
It’s after the coffee break at the ‘Education Institute’ and Ambassador Palihakkara has invited questions. “You said we cannot operate in isolation. But we have opposed the intervention of foreign judges in HR issues. As a diplomat how do you view this?” a student asks. Palihakkara makes it clear that he views it with disfavour, and concern and has no doubts that the same degree of disfavour would be forthcoming from every country, were such a thing suggested to them.    Continue reading

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GK Haththotuwagama and His Riveting Street Theatre

Extracts from the Dr. Gamini Haththotuwegama Memorial Lecture delivered by Nihal Rajapakse at OPA Auditorium on the invitation of Richmond 60-70 Group.

Wikipedia describes Dr. Gamini Haththotuwegama in the following manner. “He was a Sri Lankan playwright, director, actor, critic and educator. He is widely known as the father of modern street theatre. He is among the most influential directors of post independent Sri Lanka.”

 Dr. Gamini Haththotuwegama … GK to us Galileans and to the occupants of Ramanathan Hall at Peradeniya in the late 1950s

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Professor Laksiri Jayasuriya: A Far-Reaching life in Sri Lanka and Australia, 1931-2018

Siri Gamage, courtesy of Colombo Telegraph

Emeritus Professor Laksiri Jayasuriya (Laksiri) who was Professor of Social Work and Social administration at the University of Western Australia passed away on April 20th 2018 in Perth. He was the founder of the sociology department at the University of Colombo and led an illustrious career in the Australian academia while contributing to government policy making processes in areas such as multiculturalism, ethnic affairs,migration and citizenship. He nurtured cohorts of students under his care during his long career in Australia and continued to engage in scholarly activities and publishing after retirement. Professor Jayasuriya leaves behind bellowed wife Rohini and two loving sons Kanishka and Pradeep – both professionals – one in the academia and the other in medical field. His death comes as a great loss to his academic colleagues, particularly in Australia and Sri Lanka.

Prof Laksiri Jayasuriya

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Profound Reflections: Jean Arasanayagam in Response to Smrti Daniel’s Searching Questions

Jean faces Smrti 

Daniel 1: What in your childhood contributed to the kind of writer you are now? What recurring motifs and images from that time find expression in your work?

JEAN1: So many factors. As I delve into my mind those images together with the diverse motifs that were part of each and every experience of my childhood. I was greatly loved and cared for by my parents and had aunts and uncles who played an important part in the lives of my brother and sister (I was the youngest) and showered us with gifts, especially books, from a very early age. My parents too read a great deal and the houses we lived in were full of books – of course the individual tastes of my parents were reflected in their reading choices. My father loved reading on everything under the sun, sport, Big Game, hunters and hunting, colonial history and landmark figures, discovery and exploration, plantations and the lives of planters in Ceylon (many of them were his friends), reminiscences, biographies, autobiographies, explorers, wars, the jungle lore of Ceylon … So much and so much, while my mother read a great deal of romantic fiction. She had a great store of memories too and would relate very adult stories to me (in between it was Hans Christian Andersen, the Grimm Brothers, fairy tales, family history where she unfolded hidden narratives which penetrated my mind and which I have reconstructed into greater dimensions to trace our lineage and bloodlines – so everything, now that I look on it all, began in my childhood, as being the youngest I was closest to them while my brother was at College, and my sister too spent more time at school (Wesley and Trinity, later the University of Colombo for my brother, and Girls’ High School for my sister). It would take reams and reams to write about just this one aspect of my childhood. There are other aspects too – the freedoms I enjoyed when I was growing up in the provincial township of Kadugannawa, living in that house on the hill. Continue reading

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The Rule of Law in Australia aids Qi Guang Guo

Michael Inman & Steven Trask, Canberra Times, 5 March 2018 where the title is Älleged Triad boss Qi Guang Guo wins $35,001 for unlawful detention””

The Australian government has been ordered to pay $35,001 to the alleged head of a Sydney-based Triad crime gang, know as the “Big Circle”, after he was wrongly locked up in immigration detention. It is the second time Qi Guang Guo, 60, has been compensated by the Commonwealth for wrongful imprisonment after he won $100,000 when he was illegally detained for 132 days between 2004 and 2005.

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