Category Archives: teaching profession

Free Education for Ceylon: Tales Missing

Prabhath de Silva, in Island, 11 July 2020, where the title is “Unsung And Forgotten Heroes of Free Education and Sri Lanka’s Missed Opportunities”

Much has been said and written about Dr. C.W.W. Kannangara for his role in the introduction of the Free Education Bill in the State Council (Sri Lanka’s legislature under the Donoughmore Constitution from 1931 to 1947) and implementation of the free education policy here. The nation owes a debt of gratitude to him but there are other unsung and forgotten heroes behind this story.

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Canines in Defence of Lanka via the SL Air Force

Dishan Joseph, in Daily News, 10 July 2020, where the title runS   SLAF Air Dog Unit: Canine ‘Scentsations’”

For seven decades the Sri Lanka Air Force (SLAF) has strategically guarded our nation’s aerial domain. Whilst most of us understand and recognise the air defence role of the SLAF, they have played an equally important role in ground operations. This covers a wider spectrum of protecting airfields, bases, training schools and air assets. Unnoticed by many, one of the silent stakeholders actively engaged in this protective function are the dog handlers and their robust canines.

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Passing the Covid with the Cricket Ball?

Simon Kolstoe, in The Conversation, 6 July 2020, where the title reads Do cricket balls really spread coronavirus

Cricket is now back on in England, despite Boris Johnson declaring cricket balls a “natural vector of disease”. His statement has frustrated cricket fans and players, but has also raised the wider question of which activities spread COVID-19. After all, unlike other activities that the UK government is actively encouraging, such as visiting pubs or restaurants, cricket is an outdoor sport where players are very unlikely to come into contact with each other.

Cricket balls showing various amounts of deterioration after play. Acabashi/Wikimedia CommonsCC BY-SA

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Adieu! Galle Fort’s Burghers …. A Swansong in the Late 1980’s

This extended Video Clip recorded in the late 1980s takes many of us back to disappearing slices of life and its interactions within the Galle Fort, an arena that has been altered in ,but nevertheless retains its old world charm even today — while boasting astronomical land prices.

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The Ceylon University College: Its First Fifteen Years, 1920-35

Thiru Arumugam, reproduced courtesy of THE CEYLANKAN August 2019 issue.

The Ceylon University College (CUC) was founded in Colombo in 1921 and prepared students for the external degree examinations of the University of London. It ceased to exist in 1942 when it was transformed into the University of Ceylon. This article traces the progress of the College during the first fifteen years of its existence and concludes with biographical notes about twenty distinguished alumni of the College who studied there during the first fifteen years.

College House, former “Regina Walauwa” beloging to the Warusahannadige De Soysas Fig 3. Former Royal College building transferred to University College, 1923

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Irangani Serasinghe: A Beacon for Her Times …. Versatility Unconfined

Madapatha Uditha, in The Island, 17/18 June 2020, with this title “Searching for Irangani” …. while highlighting is an imposition from The Editor, Thuppahi

Irangani Serasinghe turned 93 on Tuesday, June 9

If the reputations of actors can be compared to shares in a company, there’s no doubt that Irangani Serasinghe’s has always been oversubscribed: public interest in her career in not just the cinema and television, but also the theatre, has never been matched by an adequate level of quality in coverage by the media. There’s never been a shortage of articles, of course, and Kumar de Silva’s sketchy yet comprehensive portrait of her does establish the links between several aspects of her life and family and the career she eventually chose.

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College House at University College in Olden Time, 1948-52

Tissa Devendra, in Island, 14 June 2020, where the title is Remembering College House, K.G hall. Villa Venezia 1948-1952″

Those of us who had the pleasure (yes!) of being admitted to the  (one and only) University of Ceylon seventy-one years ago shared the distinction of being the first freshmen of newly independent Ceylon. Nervously we clustered round the portico of the elegant old mansion we, later, came to know as College House – an irreverent salute to the University College that preceded our University. The men hung about in groups of former schoolmates, as did the chattering young women draped in, yet unfamiliar, saris.

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Remembering the Medical Luminary Chris Uragoda

Ravi Deraniyagala, in Island, 12 June 2020, where the title reads “Dr. Chris Uragoda, a medical luminary and Erudite Scholar”

Dr. Chris Uragoda was a medical luminary, a distinguished literati, an eudite scholar and above all unassuming gentleman par excellence. He was blessed with an unparalled richness of precious human qualities.

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In Deep Appreciation of Elmo De Alwis

ONE = Nihal De Alwis: “An Appreciation – Mr. Elmo De Alwis – Pioneer in Marketing Founder Member. Sri Lanka Institute of Marketing” … from Island, 30 May 2020

Felix Elmo Arnold de Alwis born on the 29th of November, 1935, son of Felix David Lionel De Alwis and Enid de Alwis was the fifth in line by age in our family (of the surviving members at the time) of nine. Elmo was very close to me in my school days as I was born after him and probably that gave us that extra closeness and affection. Elmo’s life in this world had taught me many lessons as a brother and friend. It reflects many of his abilities, temperament, devotion, compassion, love and last of all knowledge which was diverse.

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Raina, A Lass From Lanka, at Sydney’s Pandemic Frontline

Helen Pitt, in Sydney Morning Herald, May 2020, where the title runs “Professor of Lankan descent now one of world’s top infectious disease specialists”

Professor Raina MacIntyre, one of the world’s leading emerging infectious diseases experts, has barely budged from the bedroom of her Wahroonga home since the outbreak of COVID-19 in Australia.

Raina MacIntyre as a medical student in 1984

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