Category Archives: transport and communications

The Epitome of Scholarship in British Migration History and Much More: Eric Richards’ Publications Galore

PUBLICATIONS  OF  ERIC  RICHARDS:  A LISTING up to November 2018 provided by Robert Fitzsimons of Flinders University

Publication forthcoming:

 * “Migration at Extremes”. Keynote address at the conference Colonial and Wartime Migration, 1815-1918, Amiens, France, 12-14 September, 2018.

*  “Migrants in Crisis in Nineteenth-Century Britain.” In The Oxford Handbook of Migration Crises, edited by Cecilia Manjvar, Marie Ruiz and Immanuel Ness. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.

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Filed under accountability, asylum-seekers, Australian culture, australian media, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, colonisation schemes, cultural transmission, economic processes, heritage, historical interpretation, immigration, land policies, legal issues, life stories, modernity & modernization, politIcal discourse, transport and communications, travelogue, welfare & philanthophy, working class conditions, world events & processes

Sinhalese War Poems and the Portuguese

Rohini Paranavitana … a reprint of an article from Jorge Flores (ed.) Re-exploring the links. History and Constructed History=ies between Portugal and Sri Lanka, Wiesdbaden, Harassowitz Verlag , 2007, pp. 49-62.

Sri Lankan classical literature enriched with Buddhist thought did not promote any war or violence up to about the 16th century. Even though war is involved in these writings, the classical writers took the North Indian legendary war as a model. The European model of war was experienced in Sri Lanka only after the arrival of the Portuguese on the island. It was quite a new experience to the Sinhala king and his army to retaliate against Europeans as invaders. The Portuguese engaged in ruthless war with a nation which had a great poetic tradition that made use of this new experience to generate a new area of literary expression within the tradition, referred to as “war poems”.

 

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Filed under atrocities, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, disparagement, economic processes, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, political demonstrations, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, power politics, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, vengeance, violence of language, war reportage, world events & processes

Imran Khan on Why China is Important for Pakistan

IMRAN KHAN

  • Money-laundering & corruption as a bane for poorer countries — promoting the widening of the gap between poor & rich countries
  •  How a cricketer became a politician
  • Admiration for China for its alleviation of poverty over the course of  several decades … and its targeting of white-collar criminals
  • Special investment zones as boost for our growth — with Chinese aid
  • Multi-dimensional strands in Chinese Developement and its Aid for Pakistan

 

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/FMfcgxvzLXBndkQPZmlQVDNKvdnMsWXt?projector=1

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Filed under China and Chinese influences, cultural transmission, democratic measures, economic processes, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, life stories, politIcal discourse, power politics, transport and communications, world events & processes

Imperialism: Another Michael Roberts in Debate with one John Smith

“Getting off the fence on modern imperialism” .at MICHAEL ROBERTS’ BLOG = https://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2016/07/19/getting-off-the-fence-on-modern-imperialism/

Those of you who have been following the discussion on modern imperialism on my blog will know it was kicked off by two books: one by John Smith called Imperialism in the 21st century and one by TonY Corfield cyalled The City – London and the power of finance.  The discussion on my blog was expanded at the recent workshop on Imperialism in London, where the analysis was developed among upwards of 100 participants.

Since then, John Smith has sent in a long comment on my last post on that workshop which merits some decent space and a reply.

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Filed under accountability, american imperialism, authoritarian regimes, British imperialism, China and Chinese influences, modernity & modernization, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, world events & processes

Ranil Wickremasinghe at the Oxford Union delineating the Geo-Politics of the Indian Ocean over Time

Today I had the opportunity to speak at two hallowed British institutions: the London Stock Exchange founded in 1698, and now at the Oxford Union born in 1823. Many Sri Lankans educated at Oxford have made an impact in Sri Lanka. Among them were two Presidents of this very Union – my colleagues – Lalith Athulathmudali – we studied at the same school, we entered Parliament at the same time in 1977 and we sat in the same Cabinets. Lakshman Kadirgamar, who like me, studied for the LLB at the University of Colombo, and then came to Balliol. They were both Presidents of the Union in the Hillary terms of 1957-58 and 1958-59, respectively, and both their lives were cut short by the violence perpetrated by the LTTE.

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Sujit Suvisundaram = Director of The Centre of South Asian Studies, Cambridge University

Sujit Sivasundaram is the Director of the Centre of South Asian Studies, Reader in the Faculty of History and a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College. He works on the Indo-Pacific world, with a deep commitment to South and Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean. His last book was ‘Islanded’, on the makings of Sri Lanka. He is co-editor of ‘The Historical Journal’ and a Councillor of the Royal Historical Society.

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Filed under authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, education, ethnicity, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, Indian traditions, landscape wondrous, life stories, modernity & modernization, politIcal discourse, power politics, transport and communications, travelogue, world events & processes

Diego Garcia and the Fate of Its Its Indigenized Chagossian People

 

ONE = A Summary Report

Diego Garcia is part of the Chagos Atoll, a “group of seven atolls comprising more than 60 individual tropical islands in the Indian Ocean” (Jayaweera 2018). Though discovered in 1512 by the Portuguese explorer Pedro Mascarenhas, it was uninhabited till the French moved in and took over in 1783. The atoll passed to the British after the Napoleonic wars in 1814/15. Thereafter the atoll was administered from Mauritius and was considered part of its domain. Over the years the overseers and workers imported to work the plantations and settlements on the islands became indigenized as “Chagossians” and by the 1960s are said to have been around 1500 in number (note the imprecision).

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Filed under accountability, american imperialism, atrocities, British colonialism, British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, colonisation schemes, discrimination, economic processes, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, legal issues, life stories, Middle Eastern Politics, nationalism, politIcal discourse, power politics, Responsibility to Protect or R2P, security, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, transport and communications, trauma, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, working class conditions, world events & processes, World War II