Category Archives: transport and communications

China’s Transcontinental Pathways … and Indian Ocean Issues for Lanka

Philips and Kurukulasuriya … and other items

I > Rajan Philips: “One Belt-One Road from China, but no Bridge to India: Lanka’s Development Dilemmas,” Island, 20 May 2017

Even as he bade farewell to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the end of his Vesak visit, Prime Minister Wickremesinghe was all but ready to take flight to China to attend the economic summit of the 21st Century. This was Beijing’s big splash on the world economic map, and one that India chose not to officially attend. Japan was another boycotter. A number of Indian business and think-tank figures went to Beijing as ‘unofficial delegates’, and they were critical of their government’s decision not to send at least an official delegation. 130 countries marked their presence at the two-day (May 14-15) event in Beijing, including 29 state and government leaders. Even the Trump Administration, despite its spiralling turmoil in Washington, was represented in Beijing.

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Filed under accountability, centre-periphery relations, China and Chinese influences, energy resources, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, island economy, landscape wondrous, legal issues, life stories, military strategy, nationalism, politIcal discourse, power politics, Rajapaksa regime, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, truth as casualty of war, world events & processes

Book on Ceylon Railway Heritage sponsored by The National Trust

 Scene from http://www.elakiri.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1432549&page=2 .. and not in the book as far as i know

Launch of The National Trust Book CEYLON RAILWAY HERITAGE By K.A.D. Nandasena & Vinodh Wickremeratne will be held on the 25th May 2017 at 6.15 pm followed by our Monthly Lecture No.95 at 6.30 pm at the HNB Auditorium

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Filed under British colonialism, economic processes, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, modernity & modernization, sri lankan society, transport and communications

Ceylon’s Railway History: Marvels around Ella

Sajiv Panditha, courtesy of RoarLanka where the title  is “Beyond Ella: Two Of Sri Lanka’s Greatest Railway Marvels”

Ella was once a quiet village in the Uva Province. In recent times however, the town has transformed into one of the island’s upcountry hotspots. The influx of tourism has seen Ella morph into a backpacker hub, effectively positioning itself as the “Hikka of the Hills”. Travellers flock here for the cool climes, stunning views, and adventurous hikes, but many may not be familiar with the stories along its railway line. Undoubtedly, the most scenic route to Ella is by train. After Nawalapitiya, the train begins its ascent into the central highlands, snaking through tea plantations as it reaches Pattipola, the highest broad gauge railway station in the world. Onwards, the line begins an acute descent into the Uva Province, terminating at Badulla. Ella is the last major stop before Badulla, but just beyond, lay two historic marvels of railway engineering. Continue reading

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Filed under economic processes, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, tourism, transport and communications, unusual people

Kandy’s Landscape under Sunday Observer’s Eagle Eye

Sunday Observer Team, 17 May 2017

The Sunday Observer has launched “Cityscape” where our intrepid reporters will visit cities around the country, probing the shortcomings and asking the questions no one dared to ask before. In this segment of Cityscape, our staff journalists, Maneshka Borham and Husna Inayathullah are visiting the Hill Capital Kandy, the country’s second largest city, seeking answers to a host of issues including, but not limited to, garbage, air pollution and the lack of parking spaces.

 Kandy – mid 19th century overview    Kandy Today

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Filed under accountability, centre-periphery relations, economic processes, governance, heritage, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, modernity & modernization, politIcal discourse, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, welfare & philanthophy, working class conditions

The SL Army Medical Corps and Its Services at the Battlefront

Maj Gen Sanjeewa Munasinghe, RWP RSP USP … being a Presentation at the Defence Seminar entitled Defeating Terrorism,” held at the Galadari Hotel in Colombo  between 31st May 2011 to 2nd June 2011 …. with a NOTE by Michael Roberts clarifying the context at the end of the Speech

A medical Division in taking care of the injured and meeting their medical needs, boosts the morale and confidence of the troops. The Sri Lanka Army Medical Corps is a relatively small Division and by 2006 there were only 118 officers and 3200 men of which only a small proportion could be employed in the field. In order to address this problem, a group of infantrymen from each regiment were trained as nursing assistants in the combat life support training course. This extended to all special force personnel, commandos and young medical officers. In addition, all medical officers, nurses and paramedics of the corps were given ample training in handling and managing victims of chemical exposure. At the start of the operation, all male nurses, nursing assistants and medical officers in static Military Hospitals were mobilised to operational and non-operational areas in the field. The Ministry of Health provided civil medical officers, nurses and additional surgical teams to assist in the operation and strengthen army base hospitals.

 Treating civilian casualties –– http://www.defence.lk/picturegallery/picc.asp?tfile=20090121&cat=DUTY

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Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, communal relations, female empowerment, governance, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, life stories, LTTE, medical marvels, politIcal discourse, reconciliation, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, world events & processes

The Flag of Convenience as Potential Jackpot for Sri Lanka’s Ports?

Capt A. Banerjee, Sunday Observer, 23 April, 2017, where the title was slightly i different

In the last 2 years Sri Lanka has taken considerable efforts and is slowly moving towards her desire to be the next Maritime Hub.The government and other maritime stakeholders are trying their best to put their heads together in realizing this dream. I too would like to contribute towards this initiative and feel that so much can be achieved if we can nurture this “golden goose” called Flag of Convenience. I hope with this article I am able to make you realize the great opportunity that lies ahead.

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Filed under accountability, commoditification, economic processes, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, modernity & modernization, security, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, world events & processes

Afro-Asian Hybridity across the Indian Ocean

Shihan de Silva Jayasuriya

“Lost Narratives and Hybrid Identities in the Indian Ocean: Afro-Asians” has appeared in r print in Indi@logs Vol 4 2017, pp. 11-26, ISSN: 2339-8523

ABSTRACT of Article: The voluntary movement of Africans was concurrent with their involuntary uprooting, driven by the slave trade. Trade, colonisation and slavery have been drivers of migration, interconnecting people of diverse ethnicity globally. Afro-Asian communities are both historic and contemporary and, whilst Afro-diasporic communities in the Atlantic World are well recognised, the diasporas in Asia have only become visible in the last decade. Assimilation to the diversity of the Indian Ocean has contributed to this invisibility. With the loss of patronage due to changing political scenarios, African migrants have become disenfranchised. The dynamics of their identity, shaped by strong cultural memories bring out their African roots. This paper argues that diasporic consciousness of AfroAsians is expressed through their strong cultural memories. As people with dual belongings, identifying with both the homeland and the hostland, Afro-Asians are able to reconcile their hybrid identities. With the movement of Afro-Asians from the peripheries their subaltern voices are beginning to be heard. Their eclipsed histories and lost narratives are challenging the Atlantic model of African migration. Continue reading

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Filed under economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, life stories, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, unusual people, working class conditions, world events & processes