Category Archives: unusual people

FOR Sri Lanka: Engaging Lord Naseby and His Journeys in Sri Lanka

Michael Roberts

Since I had been introduced to the British peer Lord Michael Naseby in the surrounds of the House of Lords in March 2018,[1] I assumed that he had been born into the aristocratic upper layer of British society. Wrong. It required his book Sri Lanka for me to learn that he was from the upper middle class and had contested parliamentary seats from the late-960s on behalf of the Conservative Party in what were Labour strongholds – with his peerage being of 1990s vintage. As vitally, his early career as a marketing executive had seen him working in Pakistan and Bengal in the early 1960s before he was stationed in Sri Lanka as a marketing manager for Reckitt and Colman in the period 1963-64.

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Royal College: Its Early Beginnings …. From Marsh and Boake

D. L. Seneviratne“Lam to one and all”

rolyal b to m

Royal College – Marsh to Boake FRONT COVER

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Profound Insights into Sri Lanka’s Tempestuous History

Royston Ellis, in Sunday Times UK in March 2020 where the title of his review reads  “For anyone interested in Sri Lanka, its politics and human nature”  

Lord Naseby (right) with Royston Ellis outside the House of Lords

This book by Lord Naseby, who lived in Sri Lanka from 1963 to 1964 when he was Michael Morris and an eager South Asian Marketing Manager for Reckitt & Colman, has a cover with an eye-catching red spine proclaiming “Sri Lanka in large type. It is clearly designed to attract bookshop browsers and to ensure that it becomes a prominent addition to an enthusiast’s collection of contemporary literature about Sri Lanka. Continue reading

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Virus Free? Playmates Horsing Around in Adelaide

FL …. 24 March

Hi Guys, This modelling by Unis Sydney shows why we need to exercise our social distancing now. This sort of modelling is a powerful tool in the fight against the virus and modelling becomes more powerful when supported by observation. Wuhan and China in general have provided that supporting observation.

And what does the orange fwit in America want to do....the exact bloody opposite.

If we’re to keep Saturday tennis, I’ll bring some hand sanitiser for use between sets.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-25/coronavirus-covid-19-modelling-stay-home-chart/12084144
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Census Categorization and the Bharathas and Colombo Chetties

A Note from Fabian D. K.  Schokman of Moratuwa, 22 March 2020

Dear Michael,  Thank you for this. I believe, as with most of the “lesser minorities,” the Bharatha community did not have its own classification until the 2001 census, when there was a breakthrough mostly on account of the Chetties and their successful fight to be classed as a distinct ethnicity. Throughout census history, one can see the Chetties demanding to be classed as distinct from the Tamils. The term “race” in SL, must always be seen as a synonym for “ethnicity” and not with the same connotation it derives in the West.

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Miniature Drone Weaponry: A Fearsome Future?

This video display on Artificial Intelligence within Drones has to be seen to be …. PISSING FRIGHTENED. I sent it to a few grounded pals …. Note their reactions ……

David Blacker, Ex-SL Army infantryman: “I think so.”

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When Moses paved the Way for Ranasinghe Premadasa in 1986

Elmo Jayawardena, whose original title runs thus “First Time in the African Sky”

The year was 1986, the month, September to be precise. The Non-Aligned conference was being held in Harare under the leadership of Prime Minister Robert Mugabe. 120 countries sent their leaders or their representatives to take part in the conference of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM). All the details of NAM can be found in Google and I shall not waste your time as to who started it and where and when. The story I have for you is about flying the African Sky and the background is the conference in Harare.

Harare, Zimbabwe. Sheraton hotel, where the 8th Conference of the Non-Aligned Movement is held. TASS  …. Photo by TASS via Getty Images

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