Category Archives: unusual people

John F. Kennedy meets Ceylonese Parliamentary Delegation, 14 June 1961

President John F. Kennedy Meets with Members of the Parliament of Ceylon,  14 June 1961

President John F. Kennedy meets with members of the Parliament of Ceylon. President Kennedy sits in a rocking chair and the President’s Deputy Special Assistant for National Security Affairs Walt W. Rostow stands fourth from the left (behind two men). Also included in the President’s schedule: Leader of the Ceylonese House of Representatives, Charles Percival de Silva; Clerk of the House, Ralph St. L. P. Deraniyagala; Members of the House, Sir Razik Fareed, Dr. N. M. Perera, Jinadasa Don Weerasekera; Ambassador of Ceylon, R. S. S. Gunewardene; Director of the United States Operations Mission to Ceylon, James C. Baird, Jr. Oval Office, White House, Washington, D.C.

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Filed under accountability, life stories, politIcal discourse, sri lankan society, unusual people, world affairs

Royal-Thomian Rivalry and Revelry 2017

References courtesy of  SENAKA WEERARATNA  

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Filed under cricket for amity, cultural transmission, power politics, propaganda, reconciliation, rehabilitation, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, taking the piss, the imaginary and the real, tolerance, trauma, travelogue, unusual people, wild life, zealotry

Captives!! Drama on the High Seas for Lankan Seamen

 

Manjula Fernando,  in the Sunday Observer, 18 March 2018

The Sri Lankan crew of the UAE-managed oil tanker, Aris 13, now in Somalia’s commercial capital Bosaso were still uncertain of their return to Sri Lanka, despite a dramatic rescue aided by Combined and EU maritime forces on Friday. The Chief Officer Ruwan Sampath of the Comoros-lagged bunkering tanker, seized by pirates off Somali coastal city Alula last Monday, said they were ready to sign off after a days of ordeal in mid sea with the ruthless pirates but the Shipping company, Aurora Shipping is yet to make a pledge.

The Sunday Observer received this exclusive picture of the Sri Lankan crew after their release by the Somali pirates (Pic courtesy ARIS -13 crew

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Filed under accountability, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, legal issues, life stories, politIcal discourse, security, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, trauma, unusual people, working class conditions, world events & processes

High Sea High Jinks: Somali Pirates and Tanker with Sri Lankan Seamen

ONE: Norman Palihawadane: “Rescued SL crew expected back in Colombo today,” … Island, 18 March 2017 

Sri Lankan crew members of the hijacked Aris 13 vessel said that the Somalian pirates had robbed all their possessions before leaving the ship. They were left with only their clothes and mobile phones, they said. Chief Engineer of the vessel, Jayantha Kalubowila told The Island over the phone that Aris 13 with eight Sri Lankan crew members on-board had arrived at the Port of Bosaso located in North Eastern Somalia Puntland region yesterday.

 Namalee Makalandawa, (2R) a sister of Sampath, who is one of the crew members of an oil tanker hijacked by Somali pirates looks on as she sits with other relatives during a press conference in Colombo on March 17, 2017, after the release of the eight-member all Sri Lankan crew along with their foreign-owned oil tanker which had been seized by Somali pirates four days earlier. LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP

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Filed under accountability, Indian Ocean politics, legal issues, life stories, the imaginary and the real, trauma, unusual people, world events & processes

Daya’s Study of Suicide Bombers of Sri Lanka

http://repo.jfn.ac.lk/med/bitstream/701/1011/1/Somasundaram-Suicide%20bombers%20of%20Sri%20Lanka.pdf

Daya Somasundaram … http://repo.jfn.ac.lk/med/bitstream/701/1011/1/Somasundaram-Suicide%20bombers%20of%20Sri%20Lanka.pdf

 image of Asian Journal of Social Sciencedaya-11

ABSTRACT  The phenomena of suicide bombers in Sri Lanka share some similarities with but also have some marked differences with what is seen in other parts of world today. Increasing discrimination, state humiliation and violence against the minority Tamils brought out a militancy and the phenomena of suicide bombers. The underlying socio-political and economical factors in the North and East of Sri Lanka that caused the militancy at the onset are examined. Some of these factors that were the cause of or consequent to the conflict include: extrajudicial killing of one or both parents or relations by the state; separations, destruction of home and belongings during the war; displacement; lack of adequate or nutritious food; ill health; economic difficulties; lack of access to education; not seeing any avenues for future employment and advancement; social and political oppression; and facing harassment, detention and death. At the same time, the Tamil militants have used various psychological methods to entice youth, children and women to join and become suicide bombers. Public displays of war paraphernalia, posters of fallen heroes, speeches and video, particularly in schools and community gatherings, heroic songs and stories, public funeral rites and annual remembrance ceremonies draw out feelings of patriotism and create a martyr cult. The religio-cultural context of the Tamils has provided meaning and symbols for the creation and maintenance of this cult, while the LTTE has provided the organisational capacity to train and indoctrinate a special elite as suicide bombers. Whether the crushing of the LTTE militarily by the state brings to an end the phenomena of suicide bombers or whether it will re-emerge in other forms if underlying grievances are not resolved remains to be seen.

KEY WORDS: Altruistic suicide; Ethnic conflict; Insurgency; Sacrifice; Sri Lanka; Suicide bombers Continue reading

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Filed under cultural transmission, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, life stories, LTTE, martyrdom, meditations, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, religiosity, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil Tiger fighters, terrorism, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, world events & processes, zealotry

Being an ex-Tiger Today. Where have all the roads gone, long time passing!

Arthur Wamanan & Ruwan Laknath Jayakody courtesy of The Nation, 11 March 2017, where the title is The battle after the war”

Life continues to be a struggle for 45-year-old Kathir, a former Tamil Tiger combatant, and his family. Kathir was one of the 12,000 Tiger cadres who underwent a rehabilitation process soon after the end of the war. Kathir was lucky to be released after a year of rehabilitation. “I was disabled due to the war and therefore my time at rehabilitation centres was just one year,” he said.

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Filed under historical interpretation, island economy, life stories, LTTE, meditations, politIcal discourse, reconciliation, rehabilitation, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil civilians, Tamil Tiger fighters, tolerance, unusual people, welfare & philanthophy, women in ethnic conflcits

Bill Leak etches no more…. Appreciations galore

Bill Leak, the editorial cartoonist for THE AUSTRALIAN, passed away at the age of 61 from a heart attack. The VALE iin appreciation in that newspaper extends to several pages. But perhaps the best epitaph was from the cartoonist Paul Broelman in the Geelong Advertiser–showing a memorial in stone of a hand with the index finger extended as “Up Yours!!”

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Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, life stories, modernity & modernization, news fabrication, politIcal discourse, press freedom, pulling the leg, slanted reportage, unusual people, world affairs